Human Genetics

, Volume 129, Issue 6, pp 611–615 | Cite as

Lingo2 variants associated with essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease

  • Yi-Wen Wu
  • K. M. Prakash
  • Tian-Yi Rong
  • Hui-Hua Li
  • Qin Xiao
  • Louis C. Tan
  • Wing-Lok Au
  • Jian-qing Ding
  • Sheng-di Chen
  • Eng-King Tan
Original Investigation

Abstract

LINGO2, a member of LRR gene family, has been linked with both Essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, there is a lack of conclusive evidence regarding the etiologic role of LINGO2 genetic variants. We investigated the association of LINGO2 variants with ET and PD in two independent Asian countries. A total of 1,262 subjects comprising 499 controls, 436 PD patients, and 327 ET patients were included. Eight LINGO2 variants, including four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and four coding variants, were initially analyzed in one Asian population. SNPs that showed positive association were then replicated in the second independent Asian population, and a pooled analysis was carried out. Out of the eight variants, two SNPs (rs7033345 and rs10812774) revealed significant or strong positive trend in the first Asian population, and these were analyzed in the second Asian population. In the pooled analysis, the CC genotype at rs7033345 had a higher risk of developing PD (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.18, 2.35, p = 0.003) and ET (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.02, 2.20, p = 0.04) under a recessive model. The C allele at rs10812774 increased the risk of ET (OR = 1.56 95% CI = 1.10, 2.22, p = 0.01) via a recessive model. The effect size and direction of trend were in the same direction in each of the two populations. Our study demonstrated for the first time that rs7033345 is associated with PD and ET and rs10812774 with ET among Asians, suggesting that LINGO2 might act as a susceptibility gene for both conditions.

Supplementary material

439_2011_955_MOESM1_ESM.docx (14 kb)
Supplemental Table 1 (DOCX 13 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yi-Wen Wu
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. M. Prakash
    • 3
  • Tian-Yi Rong
    • 1
  • Hui-Hua Li
    • 3
  • Qin Xiao
    • 1
  • Louis C. Tan
    • 3
  • Wing-Lok Au
    • 3
  • Jian-qing Ding
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sheng-di Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eng-King Tan
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Ruijin HospitalShanghai Jiaotong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Lab of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Health Science, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS)Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shanghai Jiaotong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Departments of Neurology and Clinical ResearchSingapore General Hospital, National Neuroscience Institute, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical SchoolSingaporeSingapore

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