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Human Genetics

, Volume 129, Issue 4, pp 379–385 | Cite as

DFNB89, a novel autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment locus on chromosome 16q21-q23.2

  • Sulman Basit
  • Kwanghyuk Lee
  • Rabia Habib
  • Leon Chen
  • Umm-e-Kalsoom
  • Regie Lyn P. Santos-Cortez
  • Zahid Azeem
  • Paula Andrade
  • Muhammad Ansar
  • Wasim Ahmad
  • Suzanne M. LealEmail author
Original Investigation

Abstract

DFNB89 is a novel autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) locus that was mapped to 16q21-q23.2. Linkage to the region was established by carrying out genome-wide linkage scans in two unrelated, consanguineous Pakistani families segregating ARNSHI. The maximum multipoint LOD score is 9.7 for both families and for each family, a significant maximum LOD score of 6.0 and 3.7 were obtained. The 3-unit support interval and the region of homozygosity for the two families extend from rs717293 (chr16: 62.1 Mb) to rs728929 (chr16: 78.2 Mb) and contain 16.1 Mb of sequence. A total of 146 genes are within the DFNB89 interval. Eight candidate genes, CALB2, CDH1, CDH3, CDH11, HAS3, NOB1, PLEKHG4 and SMPD3, were sequenced, but no potentially causal variants were discovered. DFNB89 is the second ARNSHI locus mapped to chromosome 16.

Keywords

Hearing Impairment Otosclerosis Autosomal Recessive Usher Syndrome Multipoint Linkage Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We wish to thank the family members for their invaluable participation and cooperation. This work was funded by the Higher Education Commission, Government of Pakistan (to W.A.) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH)—National Institute of Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Grant DC03594 (to S.M.L.). Genotyping services were provided by the Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR). CIDR is fully funded through a federal contract from the NIH to The Johns Hopkins University, Contract Number N01-HG-65403. The authors declare no potential conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sulman Basit
    • 1
  • Kwanghyuk Lee
    • 2
  • Rabia Habib
    • 1
  • Leon Chen
    • 2
  • Umm-e-Kalsoom
    • 1
  • Regie Lyn P. Santos-Cortez
    • 2
  • Zahid Azeem
    • 1
  • Paula Andrade
    • 2
  • Muhammad Ansar
    • 1
  • Wasim Ahmad
    • 1
  • Suzanne M. Leal
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biological SciencesQuaid-I-Azam UniversityIslamabadPakistan
  2. 2.Department of Molecular and Human GeneticsBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA

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