Human Genetics

, Volume 125, Issue 4, pp 431–435 | Cite as

FAS −1,377 G/A polymorphism is associated with cancer susceptibility: evidence from 10,564 cases and 12,075 controls

Original Investigation

Abstract

Published data on the association between FAS −1,377 G/A polymorphism and cancer risk are inconclusive. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a meta-analysis was performed. A total of 17 studies including 10,564 cases and 12,075 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. Overall, significantly elevated cancer risk was associated with AA variant genotype when all the eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis (for AA vs GG: OR = 1.19; 95% CI = 1.01–1.40; P heterogeneity = 0.05; for recessive model: OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.04–1.41; P heterogeneity = 0.05). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, borderline statistically significantly increased risks were found among Asians for recessive model (OR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.00–1.45; P heterogeneity = 0.01). In the subgroup analysis by population-based controls or hospital-based controls, statistically significantly increased risks were found among groups with population-based controls for AA versus GG (OR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.02–1.58; P heterogeneity = 0.05) and recessive model (OR = 1.25; 95% CI = 1.00–1.59; P heterogeneity = 0.01). For breast cancer, borderline statistically significantly increased risks were found for AA versus GG (OR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.00–1.67; P heterogeneity = 0.41). In summary, this meta-analysis suggests that the FAS −1,377 G/A polymorphism is associated with cancer susceptibility.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer HospitalFudan UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical CollegeFudan UniversityShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Changzheng HospitalSecond Military Medical UniversityShanghaiChina
  4. 4.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthAnhui Medical UniversityAnhuiChina
  5. 5.Department of Anesthesiology, Shanghai Changzheng HospitalSecond Military Medical UniversityShanghaiChina
  6. 6.Department of Infection and Liver Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical CollegeWenzhouChina

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