Human Genetics

, Volume 116, Issue 6, pp 476–485

FISH analysis of hematological neoplasias with 1p36 rearrangements allows the definition of a cluster of 2.5 Mb included in the minimal region deleted in 1p36 deletion syndrome

  • Idoya Lahortiga
  • Iria Vázquez
  • Elena Belloni
  • José P. Román
  • Patrizia Gasparini
  • Francisco J. Novo
  • Isabel Zudaire
  • Pier G. Pelicci
  • Jesús M. Hernández
  • María J. Calasanz
  • María D. Odero
Original Investigation

Abstract

Rearrangements in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1 are recurrent aberrations in a broad spectrum of human neoplasias. However, neither the location of the breakpoints (BP) on 1p36 nor the candidate genes have been fully determined. We have characterized, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the BP in 26 patients with hematological neoplasias and 1p36 rearrangements in the G-banding karyotype. FISH allowed a better characterization of all samples analyzed. Nine cases (35%) showed reciprocal translocations, 15 (58%) unbalanced rearrangements, and two (7%) deletions. We describe two new recurrent aberrations. In 18 of the 26 cases analyzed the BP were located in band 1p36, which is 25.5 Mb long. In 14 of these 18 cases (78%) and without distinction between myeloid and lymphoid neoplasias, the BP clustered in a 2.5 Mb region located between 1p36.32 and the telomere. Interestingly, this region is contained in the 10.5 Mb cluster on 1p36.22-1pter defined in cases with 1p36 deletion syndrome. The 2.5 Mb region, located on 1p36.32-1pter, has a higher frequency of occurrence of tandem repeats and segmental duplications larger than 1 kb, when compared with the 25.5 Mb of the complete 1p36 band. This could explain its proneness for involvement in chromosomal rearrangements in hematological neoplasias.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Idoya Lahortiga
    • 1
  • Iria Vázquez
    • 1
    • 2
  • Elena Belloni
    • 3
    • 4
  • José P. Román
    • 2
  • Patrizia Gasparini
    • 3
    • 4
  • Francisco J. Novo
    • 2
  • Isabel Zudaire
    • 1
  • Pier G. Pelicci
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Jesús M. Hernández
    • 6
  • María J. Calasanz
    • 2
  • María D. Odero
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Genetics, Division of Oncology, Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA)University of NavarraPamplonaSpain
  2. 2.Department of Genetics, School of ScienceUniversity of NavarraPamplonaSpain
  3. 3.IFOMFondazione Istituto FIRC di Oncologia MolecolareMilanItaly
  4. 4.Instituto Europeo di OncologiaMilanItaly
  5. 5.Dipartimento di Medicina, Chirurgia ed OdontoiatriaUniversita’ degli Studi di MilanoMilanItaly
  6. 6.Department of Hematology, Hospital Universitario& Centro de Investigación del CáncerUniversity of Salamanca-CSICSalamancaSpain

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