Human Genetics

, Volume 118, Issue 2, pp 295–300 | Cite as

IL-10 promoter single nucleotide polymorphisms are significantly associated with resistance to leprosy

  • Dheeraj Malhotra
  • Katayoon Darvishi
  • Soni Sood
  • Swarkar Sharma
  • Chander Grover
  • Vineet Relhan
  • B. S. N. Reddy
  • R. N. K. Bamezai
Short Report

Abstract

The minor haplotype −3575A/-2849G/-2763C in IL-10 promoter has been defined as a marker of disease resistance to leprosy and its severity in Brazilian population. Our investigation of six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IL-10 promoter in 282 Indian leprosy patients and 266 healthy controls by direct PCR sequencing, however, showed that the extended haplotype: −3575T/-2849G/-2763C/-1082A/-819C/-592C was associated with resistance to leprosy per se and to the development of severe form of leprosy, using either a binomial (controls vs cases, P=0.01, OR=0.58, CI=0.37–0.89) or ordinal (controls vs paucibacillary vs multibacillary, P=0.004) model. Whereas, IL-10 haplotype −3575T/-2849G/-2763C/-1082A/-819T/-592A was associated with the risk of development of severe form of leprosy (P=0.0002) in contrast to the minor risk haplotype −3575T/-2849A/-2763C in the Brazilian population. The role of IL-10 promoter SNPs in Brazilian and Indian population strongly suggests the involvement of IL-10 locus in the outcome of leprosy.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful to Prof. Jason P. Sinnwell for his invaluable support in providing Haplo.Stats package instructions and statistical analysis. Financial support provided to the National Centre of Applied Human Genetics by the University Grants Commission (New Delhi, India), Grant number: F17-4/2001/(NEW SCHEME/COS1) is duly acknowledged. The authors acknowledge the infrastructural support provided by the Centre for Advanced Studies (funded by UGC), School of Life Sciences, JNU, New Delhi.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dheeraj Malhotra
    • 1
  • Katayoon Darvishi
    • 1
  • Soni Sood
    • 2
  • Swarkar Sharma
    • 1
  • Chander Grover
    • 2
  • Vineet Relhan
    • 2
  • B. S. N. Reddy
    • 2
  • R. N. K. Bamezai
    • 1
  1. 1.National Centre of Applied Human Genetics, School of Life SciencesJawaharlal Nehru UniversityNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Department of Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Maulana Azad Medical CollegeLok Nayak Jai Prakash HospitalNew DelhiIndia

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