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Human Genetics

, Volume 115, Issue 5, pp 357–371 | Cite as

Y chromosomal haplogroup J as a signature of the post-neolithic colonization of Europe

  • F. Di Giacomo
  • F. Luca
  • L. O. Popa
  • N. Akar
  • N. Anagnou
  • J. Banyko
  • R. Brdicka
  • G. Barbujani
  • F. Papola
  • G. Ciavarella
  • F. Cucci
  • L. Di Stasi
  • L. Gavrila
  • M. G. Kerimova
  • D. Kovatchev
  • A. I. Kozlov
  • A. Loutradis
  • V. Mandarino
  • C. Mammi′
  • E. N. Michalodimitrakis
  • G. Paoli
  • K. I. Pappa
  • G. Pedicini
  • L. Terrenato
  • S. Tofanelli
  • P. Malaspina
  • A. Novelletto
Original Investigation

Abstract

In order to attain a finer reconstruction of the peopling of southern and central-eastern Europe from the Levant, we determined the frequencies of eight lineages internal to the Y chromosomal haplogroup J, defined by biallelic markers, in 22 population samples obtained with a fine-grained sampling scheme. Our results partially resolve a major multifurcation of lineages within the haplogroup. Analyses of molecular variance show that the area covered by haplogroup J dispersal is characterized by a significant degree of molecular radiation for unique event polymorphisms within the haplogroup, with a higher incidence of the most derived sub-haplogroups on the northern Mediterranean coast, from Turkey westward; here, J diversity is not simply a subset of that present in the area in which this haplogroup first originated. Dating estimates, based on simple tandem repeat loci (STR) diversity within each lineage, confirmed the presence of a major population structuring at the time of spread of haplogroup J in Europe and a punctuation in the peopling of this continent in the post-Neolithic, compatible with the expansion of the Greek world. We also present here, for the first time, a novel method for comparative dating of lineages, free of assumptions of STR mutation rates.

Keywords

Mutation Rate Ancestral Haplotype High Relative Frequency Biallelic Marker Average Mutation Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge Dr. Vincent Macaulay for critically reviewing this manuscript during its preparation. We thank the anonymous reviewers for their useful comments. This work was supported by grant PRIN-MIUR 2002, 2003 to A.N. and PRIN-MIUR 2003 to G.Pa. Sampling in Russia was carried out within the frame of a Science and Technology Cooperation agreement between Italy and Russia (P.M. and A.I.K.: principal investigators).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Di Giacomo
    • 1
  • F. Luca
    • 2
  • L. O. Popa
    • 3
  • N. Akar
    • 4
  • N. Anagnou
    • 5
    • 20
  • J. Banyko
    • 6
  • R. Brdicka
    • 7
  • G. Barbujani
    • 8
  • F. Papola
    • 9
  • G. Ciavarella
    • 10
  • F. Cucci
    • 11
  • L. Di Stasi
    • 12
  • L. Gavrila
    • 3
  • M. G. Kerimova
    • 13
  • D. Kovatchev
    • 14
  • A. I. Kozlov
    • 15
  • A. Loutradis
    • 16
  • V. Mandarino
    • 2
  • C. Mammi′
    • 17
  • E. N. Michalodimitrakis
    • 5
    • 21
  • G. Paoli
    • 18
  • K. I. Pappa
    • 5
    • 20
  • G. Pedicini
    • 19
  • L. Terrenato
    • 1
  • S. Tofanelli
    • 18
  • P. Malaspina
    • 1
  • A. Novelletto
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity “Tor Vergata”RomeItaly
  2. 2.Department of Cell BiologyUniversity of CalabriaRendeItaly
  3. 3.Genetics DepartmentUniversity of BucharestBucharestRumania
  4. 4.Pediatrics DepartmentAnkara UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  5. 5.School of MedicineUniversity of Athens AthensGreece
  6. 6.University of P. J. SafarikKosiceSlovak Republic
  7. 7.Institute for Haematology and Blood TransfusionPragueCzech Republic
  8. 8.Department of BiologyUniversity of FerraraFerraraItaly
  9. 9.Centro Regionale di Immunoematologia e Tipizzazione TissutaleL’AquilaItaly
  10. 10.IRCCS Casa Sollievo della SofferenzaS. Giovanni RotondoItaly
  11. 11.Az. Osp. PerrinoBrindisiItaly
  12. 12.A.S.L. 1PaolaItaly
  13. 13.Department of HygieneAzerbaijan Medical UniversityBakuAzerbaijan
  14. 14.Department of BiologyMedical UniversityVarnaBulgaria
  15. 15.Arct-An C Innovative LaboratoryMoscowRussian Federation
  16. 16.Ministry of Health Center for ThalassemiaAthensGreece
  17. 17.A.S.L. BMMReggio CalabriaItaly
  18. 18.Department of Ethology, Ecology and EvolutionUniversity of PisaPisaItaly
  19. 19.Az. Osp. RummoBeneventoItaly
  20. 20.Institute of Molecular Biology and BiotechnologyHeraklionGreece
  21. 21.University of Crete School of Medicine, Laboratory of Toxicology and Forensic MedicineHeraklionCrete

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