Molecular Genetics and Genomics

, Volume 274, Issue 3, pp 229–234 | Cite as

Characterization and mapping of Rpi1, a gene that confers dominant resistance to stalk rot in maize

  • D.E. Yang
  • D.M. Jin
  • B. Wang
  • D.S. Zhang
  • H.-T. Nguyen
  • C.L. Zhang
  • S.J. Chen
Original Paper

Abstract

The maize inbred lines 1145 (resistant) and Y331 (susceptible), and the F1, F2 and BC1F1 populations derived from them were inoculated with the pathogen Pythium inflatum Matthews, which causes stalk rot in Zea mays. Field data revealed that the ratio of resistant to susceptible plants was 3:1 in the F2 population, and 1:1 in the BC1F1population, indicating that the resistance to P. inflatum Matthews was controlled by a single dominant gene in the 1145×Y331 cross. The gene that confers resistance to P. inflatum Matthews was designated Rpi1 for resistance to P. inflatum) according to the standard nomenclature for plant disease resistance genes. Fifty SSR markers from 10 chromosomes were first screened in the F2 population to find markers linked to the Rpi1 gene. The results indicated that umc1702 and mmc0371 were both linked to Rpi1, placing the resistance gene on chromosome 4. RAPD (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA) markers were then tested in the F2population using bulked segregant analysis (BSA). Four RAPD products were found to show linkage to the Rpi1 gene. Then 27 SSR markers and 8 RFLP markers in the region encompassing Rpi1 were used for fine-scale mapping of the resistance gene. Two SSR markers and four RFLP markers were linked to the Rpi1 gene. Finally, the Rpi1 gene was mapped between the SSR markers bnlg1937 and agrr286 on chromosome 4, 1.6 cM away from the former and 4.1 cM distant from the latter. This is the first time that a dominant gene for resistance to maize stalk rot caused by P. inflatum Matthews has been mapped with molecular marker techniques.

Key words:

Maize stalk rot Resistance gene Mapping Rpi1 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • D.E. Yang
    • 1
  • D.M. Jin
    • 1
  • B. Wang
    • 1
  • D.S. Zhang
    • 2
  • H.-T. Nguyen
    • 2
  • C.L. Zhang
    • 3
  • S.J. Chen
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Genetics and Developmental BiologyChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingP. R. China
  2. 2.Texas Tech UniversityLubbockUSA
  3. 3.China Agricultural UniversityBeijingChina

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