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Parasitology Research

, Volume 83, Issue 2, pp 121–125 | Cite as

Recovery of waterborne oocysts of Cryptosporidium from water samples by the membrane-filter dissolution method

  • T. K. Graczyk
  • M. R. Cranfield
  • R. Fayer
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

The cellulose-acetate membrane (CAM)-filter dissolution method implemented into a Millipore Glass Microanalysis system was used for recovery of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts seeded into 25 l of drinking water in polyethylene carboy aspirator bottles. CAM-entrapped oocysts were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. From 65 to 94 oocysts/l (mean 75 oocysts/l), 34.7% overall of the inoculated oocysts, were unrecovered as determined after the water had been drained from the bottle, rinsed with 1 l of eluting fluid (EF), and CAM-filtered. Efficiency rates of oocyst recovery ranged from 24.0% to 64.0% (mean 44.1%), without the use of EF and from 72.1% to 82.3% (mean 78.8%) when EF was used. To ensure a high recovery efficiency of Cryptosporidium oocysts from sampled water by the CAM-filter dissolution method, it is recommended that 1 l of EF per 25 l of water be used.

Keywords

Polyethylene Water Sample Drinking Water High Recovery Immunofluorescence Microscopy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. K. Graczyk
    • 1
  • M. R. Cranfield
    • 2
  • R. Fayer
    • 3
  1. 1.Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USATP
  2. 2.Medical Department, The Baltimore Zoo, Druid Hill Park, Baltimore, MD 21217, USATP
  3. 3.Immunity and Disease Prevention Laboratory, Livestock and Poultry Sciences Institute, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705, USAUS

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