Parasitology Research

, Volume 87, Issue 5, pp 368–370 | Cite as

Cryptosporidium parvum Genotype 2 infections in free-ranging mountain gorillas (Gorilla gorilla beringei) of the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda

  • T. Graczyk
  • A. DaSilva
  • M. Cranfield
  • J. Nizeyi
  • G. Kalema
  • N. Pieniazek
Original Paper

Abstract

For behavioral research and due to growing ecotourism, some populations of free-ranging mountain gorillas (Gorilla gorilla beringei) have become habituated to humans. Molecular analysis of two Cryptosporidium sp. oocyst isolates originating from two human-habituated gorilla groups and two oocyst isolates from non-habituated gorillas yielded positive identification of C. parvum Genotype 2 (G2; i.e., "cattle", "animal-adapted", or "zoonotic"). As G2 is cross-transmissible between humans and animals, C. parvum infections can be propagated in the habitats of human-habituated, free-ranging gorillas through both zoonotic and anthroponotic transmission cycles.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Graczyk
    • 1
  • A. DaSilva
    • 3
  • M. Cranfield
    • 2
  • J. Nizeyi
    • 4
  • G. Kalema
    • 5
  • N. Pieniazek
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205USA
  2. 2.Medical Department, The Baltimore Zoo, Baltimore, MD 21217USA
  3. 3.Division of Parasitic Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Public Services, Atlanta, GA 30341USA
  4. 4.Morris Animal Foundation's Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project, Department of Wildlife and Animal Resource Management, Makerere University, KampalaUganda
  5. 5.Uganda Wildlife Authority, KampalaUganda

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