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Parasitology Research

, Volume 117, Issue 11, pp 3683–3687 | Cite as

Establishment of Fascioloides magna in a new region of Hungary: case report

  • Eszter Nagy
  • Ildikó Jócsák
  • Ágnes Csivincsik
  • Attila Zsolnai
  • Tibor Halász
  • András Nyúl
  • Zsolt Plucsinszki
  • Tamás Simon
  • Szilárd Szabó
  • Janka Turbók
  • Csaba Nemes
  • László Sugár
  • Gábor Nagy
Short Communication
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Abstract

During the monitoring of red deer (N = 124) and fallow deer (N = 13) populations in four neighbouring areas, the presence of Fascioloides magna was confirmed in southwestern Hungary. The prevalence and the mean intensity of the infection within the host populations ranged between 0 and 100% and 0–36.3, respectively. The determined prevalences are similar to that observed earlier in other European natural foci. The authors hypothesise that the appearance of F. magna in this region should have been a partly natural- and partly human-influenced process.

Keywords

Fascioloides magna Red deer Fallow deer Hungary 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are very thankful to Jenő Jung huntmaster of Liget Hunting Party and Róbert Tóth huntmaster of Zselic Hunting Party for their expert, which helped our investigation, and Prof. Colin Mackintosh and Assoc. Prof. Gábor Csizmadia for their practical and linguistic advices.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eszter Nagy
    • 1
  • Ildikó Jócsák
    • 2
  • Ágnes Csivincsik
    • 3
  • Attila Zsolnai
    • 4
  • Tibor Halász
    • 5
  • András Nyúl
    • 5
  • Zsolt Plucsinszki
    • 5
  • Tamás Simon
    • 5
  • Szilárd Szabó
    • 5
  • Janka Turbók
    • 6
  • Csaba Nemes
    • 6
  • László Sugár
    • 7
  • Gábor Nagy
    • 8
  1. 1.ZselickisfaludHungary
  2. 2.Department of Physiology and Animal HygieneKaposvar UniversityKaposvárHungary
  3. 3.Medicopus Ltd.KaposvárHungary
  4. 4.Research Institute for Animal Breeding, Nutrition and Meat ScienceHerceghalomHungary
  5. 5.Hunting DepartmentSEFAG PlcKaposvárHungary
  6. 6.National Food Chain Safety Office, Veterinary Diagnostic DirectorateKaposvárHungary
  7. 7.Department of Wildlife Biology and EthologyKaposvar UniversityKaposvárHungary
  8. 8.Department of Animal NutritionKaposvar UniversityKaposvárHungary

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