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Parasitology Research

, Volume 115, Issue 10, pp 3679–3682 | Cite as

Molecular survey of arthropod-borne pathogens in sheep keds (Melophagus ovinus), Central Europe

  • Ivo RudolfEmail author
  • Lenka Betášová
  • Vlastimil Bischof
  • Kristýna Venclíková
  • Hana Blažejová
  • Jan Mendel
  • Zdeněk Hubálek
  • Michael Kosoy
Short Communication

Abstract

In the study, we screened a total of 399 adult sheep keds (Melophagus ovinus) for the presence of RNA and DNA specific for arboviral, bacterial, and protozoan vector-borne pathogens. All investigated keds were negative for flaviviruses, phleboviruses, bunyaviruses, Borrelia burgdorferi, Rickettsia spp., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, “Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis,” and Babesia spp. All ked pools were positive for Bartonella DNA. The sequencing of the amplified fragments of the gltA and 16S-23S rRNA demonstrated a 100 % homology with Bartonella melophagi previously isolated from a sheep ked and from human blood in the USA. The identification of B. melophagi in sheep keds in Central Europe highlights needs extending a list of hematophagous arthropods beyond ticks and mosquitoes for a search of emerging arthropod-borne pathogens.

Keywords

Melophagus ovinus Bartonella melophagi Rickettsiae Arboviruses Borrelia burgdorferi Babesia spp. 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank the Operational Programme Education for Competiveness project CEB (CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0183) and projects MUNI/A/1437/2014 and MUNI/A/1013/2015.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ivo Rudolf
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Lenka Betášová
    • 1
  • Vlastimil Bischof
    • 3
  • Kristýna Venclíková
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Hana Blažejová
    • 1
  • Jan Mendel
    • 1
  • Zdeněk Hubálek
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael Kosoy
    • 5
  1. 1.Institute of Vertebrate Biology, v.v.i.Academy of SciencesBrnoCzech Republic
  2. 2.Department of Experimental BiologyMasaryk UniversityBrnoCzech Republic
  3. 3.ZlínCzech Republic
  4. 4.Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, v.v.i.Academy of Sciences of the Czech RepublicPragueCzech Republic
  5. 5.Division of Vector-Borne DiseasesCenters for Disease Control and PreventionFort CollinsUSA

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