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Parasitology Research

, Volume 115, Issue 6, pp 2341–2351 | Cite as

Description of new types of sphaeractinomyxon actinospores (Myxozoa: Myxosporea) from marine tubificid oligochaetes, with a discussion on the validity of the tetraspora and the endocapsa as actinospore collective group names

  • Luis F. RangelEmail author
  • Ricardo Castro
  • Sónia Rocha
  • Gábor Cech
  • Graça Casal
  • Carlos Azevedo
  • Csaba Székely
  • Francisca Cavaleiro
  • Maria J. Santos
Original Paper

Abstract

Ten new types of sphaeractinomyxon actinospores are morphologically and molecularly described from the coelomic cavity of two marine oligochaete hosts, Limnodriloides agnes (Hrabě, 1967) and Tubificoides pseudogaster (Dahl, 1960), from Aveiro estuary, Portugal. The smallest sphaeractinomyxon type measured 17 μm (length) × 19 μm (width) × 19 μm (apical diameter), whereas the largest type measured 61 μm × 76 μm × 80 μm. While considering the 10 types of sphaeractinomyxon, it was found that the number of spores developing inside pansporocysts varied between 1, 2, 4, and 8. The total prevalence of infection was of 19 % for the two host species, with a maximum recorded for spring and summer (25–26 %). While considering each type of sphaeractinomyxon individually, it was found that the prevalence values ranged between 0.3 and 1.7 %. All described sphaeractinomyxons were most similar to Myxobolus species. The validity of the tetraspora and endocapsa collective group names is discussed.

Keywords

Sphaeractinomyxon Oligochaeta Limnodriloides agnes Tubificoides pseudogaster Tetraspora Endocapsa 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was partially supported by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) through the COMPETE - Operational Competitiveness Programme and national funds through FCT – Foundation for Science and Technology, under the project “PEst-C/MAR/LA0015/2013” the project DIRDAMyx, reference FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020726/FCT-PTDC/MAR/116838/2010, and the Ph.D. fellowship grant SFRH/BD/82237/2011 attributed to L. Rangel and the Ph.D. fellowship grant SFRH/BD/92661/2013 attributed to S. Rocha through the programme POPH/FSE QREN, and the fellowship grants attributed to F. Cavaleiro and R. Castro through the project DIRDAMyx, reference FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020726/FCT-PTDC/MAR/116838/2010, and the Hungarian OTKA K 100132 grant. We thank for the identification of the oligochaetes for Dr. Rüdiger Schmelz. This work complies with the current laws of the country where it was performed.

Compliance with ethical standards

All applicable international, national, and/or institutional guidelines for the care and use of animals were followed.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luis F. Rangel
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Ricardo Castro
    • 2
  • Sónia Rocha
    • 2
    • 3
  • Gábor Cech
    • 4
  • Graça Casal
    • 2
    • 5
  • Carlos Azevedo
    • 2
    • 3
    • 6
  • Csaba Székely
    • 4
  • Francisca Cavaleiro
    • 2
  • Maria J. Santos
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Animal Pathology, Department of Biology, Faculty of SciencesUniversity of PortoPortoPortugal
  2. 2.Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR)University of PortoPortoPortugal
  3. 3.Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar (ICBAS)University of PortoPortoPortugal
  4. 4.Institute for Veterinary Medical Research, Centre for Agricultural ResearchHungarian Academy of SciencesBudapestHungary
  5. 5.Department of SciencesInstitute University of Health Sciences, CESPUGandraPortugal
  6. 6.Zoology Department, College of SciencesKing Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia

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