Parasitology Research

, Volume 112, Issue 6, pp 2313–2318

Survivorship of adult Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) feeding on indoor ornamental plants with no inflorescence

  • Whitney A. Qualls
  • Rui De Xue
  • John C. Beier
  • Günter C. Müller
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00436-013-3396-1

Cite this article as:
Qualls, W.A., Xue, R.D., Beier, J.C. et al. Parasitol Res (2013) 112: 2313. doi:10.1007/s00436-013-3396-1

Abstract

The international trade of lucky bamboo (Dracaena sanderiana [Asparagaceae]) is responsible for certain introductions of the exotic species Aedes albopictus (Skuse) in California and the Netherlands. Understanding the association of this species with lucky bamboo and other ornamental plants is important from a public health standpoint. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of indoor ornamental plants as sugar sources for adult A. albopictus. If exposed to D. sanderiana, bromeliad (Guzmania spp. hybrid [Bromeliaceae]), Moses-in-the-cradle (Rhoeo spathacea [Commelinaceae]), 10 % sucrose solution, and a negative water control as the only nutrient source, adult female A. albopictus mean survival time was 12, 7, 6, 15, and 4 days, respectively. Mean survival times for adult males were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from the females and were 10, 7, 6, 14, and 3 days, respectively. Combined male and female survival times were not significantly different on lucky bamboo compared to survival times on a 10 % sucrose control. Based on our findings, A. albopictus can readily survive long enough to complete a gonotrophic cycle and potentially complete the extrinsic incubation period for many arboviruses when only provided access to lucky bamboo plants or possibly other common ornamentals. Vector control professionals should be aware of potential in-home infestations and public health concerns associated with mosquito breeding and plant tissue feeding on ornamental plants.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Whitney A. Qualls
    • 1
  • Rui De Xue
    • 2
  • John C. Beier
    • 1
  • Günter C. Müller
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthUniversity of Miami Miller School of MedicineMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Anastasia Mosquito Control DistrictSt. AugustineUSA
  3. 3.Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, Kuvin Centre for the Study of Infectious and Tropical DiseasesHebrew UniversityJerusalemIsrael

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