Parasitology Research

, Volume 112, Issue 4, pp 1583–1587

Evaluation of boric acid sugar baits against Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in tropical environments

  • Diana P. Naranjo
  • Whitney A. Qualls
  • Gunter C. Müller
  • Dayana M. Samson
  • Deborah Roque
  • Temitope Alimi
  • Kristopher Arheart
  • John C. Beier
  • Rui-De Xue
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00436-013-3312-8

Cite this article as:
Naranjo, D.P., Qualls, W.A., Müller, G.C. et al. Parasitol Res (2013) 112: 1583. doi:10.1007/s00436-013-3312-8

Abstract

Attractive toxic sugar bait (active ingredient, 1 % boric acid) was evaluated against Aedes albopictus Skuse populations in the laboratory, semi-field trials, and field trials in residential communities in St. Augustine, Florida. Laboratory evaluations of boric acid sugar baits applied to the plant Pentas lanceolata (Rubiaceae) demonstrated 100 and 92 % mortality of A. albopictus at day 7 and 14, respectively. A semi-field study evaluating the bait application to the upperside or topside of leaves resulted in no significant difference on mortality (P > 0.05). Overall combined top and bottom boric acid sugar bait application mortality at day 7 was 95 % based on leaf bioassays. Field application of the boric acid sugar baits significantly (P < 0.05) decreased adult A. albopictus populations up to day 21 post-treatment compared to the pre-treatment population numbers. A significant reduction in oviposition was demonstrated both at day 7 and 14 post-application (P = 0.001) as monitored by ovitraps. Attractive toxic sugar bait application in tropical environments demonstrated efficacy, persistence, and feasibility in controlling A. albopictus populations.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diana P. Naranjo
    • 1
  • Whitney A. Qualls
    • 2
  • Gunter C. Müller
    • 3
  • Dayana M. Samson
    • 2
  • Deborah Roque
    • 2
  • Temitope Alimi
    • 2
  • Kristopher Arheart
    • 2
  • John C. Beier
    • 2
  • Rui-De Xue
    • 4
  1. 1.MAIA Program, College of Arts and SciencesUniversity of MiamiMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthUniversity of Miami Miller School of MedicineMiamiUSA
  3. 3.Department of Microbiology and Molecular GeneticsInstitute for Medical Research Israel–Canada, Kuvin Centre for the Study of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Hebrew UniversityJerusalemIsrael
  4. 4.Anastasia Mosquito Control DistrictSt. AugustineUSA

Personalised recommendations