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Parasitology Research

, Volume 111, Issue 6, pp 2377–2384 | Cite as

The immune response induced by DNA vaccine expressing nfa1 gene against Naegleria fowleri

  • Jong-Hyun Kim
  • Sang-Hee Lee
  • Hae-Jin Sohn
  • Jinyoung Lee
  • Yong-Joon Chwae
  • Sun Park
  • Kyongmin Kim
  • Ho-Joon Shin
Original Paper

Abstract

The pathogenic free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in experimental animals and in humans. The nfa1 gene that was cloned from N. fowleri is located on pseudopodia, especially amoebic food cups and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri. In this study, we constructed and characterized retroviral vector and lentiviral vector systems for nfa1 DNA vaccination in mice. We constructed the retroviral vector (pQCXIN) and the lentiviral vector (pCDH) cloned with the egfp-nfa1 gene. The expression of nfa1 gene in Chinese hamster ovary cell and human primary nasal epithelial cell transfected with the pQCXIN/egfp-nfa1 vector or pCDH/egfp-nfa1 vector was observed by fluorescent microscopy and Western blotting analysis. Our viral vector systems effectively delivered the nfa1 gene to the target cells and expressed the Nfa1 protein within the target cells. To evaluate immune responses of nfa1-vaccinated mice, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of each retro- or lentiviral vector expressing nfa1 gene. DNA vaccination using viral vectors expressing nfa1 significantly stimulated the production of Nfa1-specific IgG subclass, as well as IgG levels. In particular, both levels of IgG2a (Th1) and IgG1 (Th2) were significantly increased in mice vaccinated with viral vectors. These results show the nfa1-vaccination induce efficiently Th1 type, as well as Th2 type immune responses. This is the first report to construct viral vector systems and to evaluate immune responses as DNA vaccination in N. fowleri infection. Furthermore, these results suggest that nfal vaccination may be an effective method for treatment of N. fowleri infection.

Keywords

Viral Vector Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Viral Vector System Infect Viral Particle Primary Nasal Epithelial Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Korea Research Foundation Grant funded by the Korean Government (KRF-2008-313-E00176).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jong-Hyun Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sang-Hee Lee
    • 1
  • Hae-Jin Sohn
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jinyoung Lee
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yong-Joon Chwae
    • 1
  • Sun Park
    • 1
  • Kyongmin Kim
    • 1
  • Ho-Joon Shin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyAjou University School of MedicineSuwonRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Molecular Science and TechnologyAjou University School of MedicineSuwonRepublic of Korea

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