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Parasitology Research

, Volume 110, Issue 5, pp 2067–2070 | Cite as

Hard ticks (Ixodidae) in Romania: surveillance, host associations, and possible risks for tick-borne diseases

  • M. O. Dumitrache
  • C. M. Gherman
  • Vasile Cozma
  • V. Mircean
  • A. Györke
  • A. D. Sándor
  • A. D. Mihalca
Short Communication

Abstract

Ticks and tick-borne diseases represent a great concern worldwide. Despite this, in Romania the studies regarding this subject has just started, and the interest of medical personnel, researchers, and citizens is increasing. Because the geographical range of many tick-borne diseases started to extend as consequences of different biological and environmental factors, it is important to study the diversity of ticks species, especially correlated with host associations. A total number of 840 ticks were collected between 1 April and 1 November 2010, from 66 animals, from 17 species in 11 counties, spread all over Romania. Four Ixodidae species were identified: Dermacentor marginatus (49.2%), Ixodes ricinus (48.3%), Hyalomma marginatum (2.4%), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (0.1%). The obtained results indicate that D. marginatus is the most abundant tick species and I. ricinus is the most prevalent. As both of them are important vectors for human and animal diseases, the present paper discusses the associated risks for tick-borne diseases.

Keywords

Tick Species Babesia Babesiosis Tularemia Golden Jackal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The publication of this paper was supported from grant IDEI-PCCE CNCSIS 84, 7/2010.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. O. Dumitrache
    • 1
  • C. M. Gherman
    • 1
  • Vasile Cozma
    • 1
  • V. Mircean
    • 1
  • A. Györke
    • 1
  • A. D. Sándor
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. D. Mihalca
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Parasitology and Parasitic DiseasesUniversity of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary MedicineCluj-NapocaRomania
  2. 2.Department of Taxonomy and EcologyBabeş-Bolyai UniversityCluj-NapocaRomania

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