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Parasitology Research

, Volume 109, Issue 2, pp 305–314 | Cite as

Epidemiological survey of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the west-central region of Guangdong Province, China

  • Daixiong ChenEmail author
  • Yun Zhang
  • Haoxian Shen
  • Yongfang Wei
  • Di Huang
  • Qiming Tan
  • Xianqi Lan
  • Qingli Li
  • Zecheng Chen
  • Zhengtu Li
  • Le Ou
  • Huibing Suen
  • Xue Ding
  • Xiaodong Luo
  • Xiaomin Li
  • Ximei Zhan
Original Paper

Abstract

The study was to understand the Angiostrongylus cantonensis infectious situation of rodent definitive host, snail intermediate host, and local residents in the west-central region of Guangdong Province in China. The snails Achatina fulica and Pomacea canaliculata collected from the survey place were digested with artificial gastric juice, and the third-stage larvae of A. cantonensis in the snails were examined under microscope. The heart and lung of rats captured from the survey place were taken to check the adult of A. cantonensis. The questionnaire surveys related to the infection of A. cantonensis were taken in local residents randomly selected, and the IgG antibody against A. cantonensis was tested in those residents with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A total of 1,391 rats including eight kinds of rats, such as Rattus norvegicus, Rattus flavipectus, Bandicota indica, Rattus sladeni, Mus musculus, Rattus rattoides, Suncus Murinus, and Rattus confucianus, were examined and 132 of them were infected by A. cantonensis, with an average infection rate of 9.49% and a mean intensity of A. cantonensis in infected rats was 9.39. A total of 3,184 snails A. fulica and 3,723 snails P. canaliculata were detected. The average infection rates of them were 25.03% (797/3,184) and 6.50% (242/3,723), respectively. There were 180 positive samples of IgG antibody against A. cantonensis in 1,800 serum samples of the residents, with a positive rate of 10.00%. The west-central region of Guangdong Province is the natural focus of A. cantonensis. In comparison with the investigation results in other regions of China, the infection rate of rat definitive host is at the middle level; in the intermediate host, the infection rate of snail A. fulica is above the middle level, and the infection rate of snail Pomacea canaliculata is below the middle level. Some local residents had already been infected by A. cantonensis or at the risk of being infected.

Keywords

Infection Rate Intermediate Host Guangdong Province Definitive Host Infected Snail 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of P.R. China (U0632003) and science and technology plan projects of Guangdong Province (2010B060500017).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daixiong Chen
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yun Zhang
    • 1
  • Haoxian Shen
    • 1
  • Yongfang Wei
    • 1
  • Di Huang
    • 1
  • Qiming Tan
    • 1
  • Xianqi Lan
    • 1
  • Qingli Li
    • 1
  • Zecheng Chen
    • 1
  • Zhengtu Li
    • 1
  • Le Ou
    • 1
  • Huibing Suen
    • 1
  • Xue Ding
    • 1
  • Xiaodong Luo
    • 1
  • Xiaomin Li
    • 1
  • Ximei Zhan
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pathogenic BiologyGuangzhou Medical CollegeGuangdongChina
  2. 2.Department of Parasitology, Zhongshan School of MedicineSun Yat-sen UniversityGuangdongChina

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