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Parasitology Research

, Volume 105, Supplement 1, pp 83–90 | Cite as

Efficacy and Safety of Emodepside 2.1 %/Praziquantel 8.6% Spot-on Formulation in the Treatment of Feline Aelurostrongylosis

  • Donato TraversaEmail author
  • Piermarino Milillo
  • Angela Di Cesare
  • Beate Lohr
  • Raffaella Iorio
  • Fabrizio Pampurini
  • Roland Schaper
  • Roberto Bartolini
  • Josef Heine
Article

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the antiparasitic spot-on formulation containing emodepside 2.1 %/praziquantel 8.6% (Profender®, Bayer) in the treatment of natural feline infection with the lungworm Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Nematoda, Strongylida). Efficacy of Profender® given once at the licensed dose was tested in comparison to a control oral formulation containing fenbendazole 18.75 % (Panacur®, Intervet) given over three consecutive days at the licensed dose. Efficacy assessment was based on larvae per gramme of faeces (LPG) counts, measured on days 28 ± 2 following treatment and compared to counts on days –6 to –2. In total 24 cats treated either with Profender® (n = 12) or with Panacur (n = 12) were included in the assessment of efficacy and safety. Mean LPG post-baseline counts (days 28 ± 2) were 1.3 LPG for both Profender® and Panacur®, demonstrating similar efficacy of 99.38 % for Profender® and 99.29 % for the control product. No treated animals showed adverse events. This trial demonstrated that both Profender® spot-on formulation and oral paste Panacur® are safe and effective in the treatment of aelurotrongylosis in cats. Future practical perspectives in feline medicine and the major advantages of the spot-on product compared to the oral paste are discussed.

Keywords

Ivermectin Praziquantel Macrocyclic Lactone Moxidectin Emodepside 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donato Traversa
    • 1
    Email author
  • Piermarino Milillo
    • 1
  • Angela Di Cesare
    • 1
  • Beate Lohr
    • 2
  • Raffaella Iorio
    • 1
  • Fabrizio Pampurini
    • 3
  • Roland Schaper
    • 4
  • Roberto Bartolini
    • 1
  • Josef Heine
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Comparative Biomedical SciencesFaculty of Veterinary MedicineTeramoItaly
  2. 2.KlifovetMunichGermany
  3. 3.Bayer Animal HealthMilanoItaly
  4. 4.Bayer Animal Health GmbHLeverkusenGermany

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