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Parasitology Research

, 105:825 | Cite as

Standardization of the egg hatch test for the detection of benzimidazole resistance in parasitic nematodes

  • Georg von Samson-HimmelstjernaEmail author
  • Gerald C. Coles
  • Frank Jackson
  • Christian Bauer
  • Fred Borgsteede
  • Veli Y. Cirak
  • Janina Demeler
  • Alison Donnan
  • Pierre Dorny
  • Christian Epe
  • Achim Harder
  • Johan Höglund
  • Ronald Kaminsky
  • Dominique Kerboeuf
  • Ulla Küttler
  • Elias Papadopoulos
  • Janez Posedi
  • John Small
  • Marián Várady
  • Jozef Vercruysse
  • Nicole Wirtherle
Original Paper

Abstract

The ability to reliably detect anthelmintic resistance is a crucial part of resistance management. If data between countries are to be compared, the same test should give the same results in each laboratory. As the egg hatch test for benzimidazole resistance is used for both research and surveys, the ability of different laboratories to obtain similar results was studied through testing of known isolates of cyathostomins, Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, and Cooperia oncophora in programs supported by the EU (Cost B16 and FP6-PARASOL). Initial results showed difficulties in obtaining reproducible and similar data within and between laboratories. A series of ring tests, i.e., simultaneous and coordinated rounds of testing of nematode isolates in different laboratories was subsequently performed. By adopting identical protocols, especially the use of deionized water and making dilutions of thiabendazole in dimethyl sulfoxide in the final ring test, laboratories correctly identified both susceptible and resistant isolates. The protocols for the test and preparation of solutions of thiabendazole are described.

Keywords

Resistant Isolate Thiabendazole Hatch Rate Ring Test Anthelmintic Resistance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The financial support through the EU-Cost action B16 and the FP6 PARASOL (FOOD-CT-2005-022851) project is thankfully acknowledged. We are most thankful to all colleagues from the laboratories listed in Table 1 involved in performing the ring tests.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Georg von Samson-Himmelstjerna
    • 1
    Email author
  • Gerald C. Coles
    • 2
  • Frank Jackson
    • 3
  • Christian Bauer
    • 4
  • Fred Borgsteede
    • 5
  • Veli Y. Cirak
    • 6
  • Janina Demeler
    • 1
  • Alison Donnan
    • 3
  • Pierre Dorny
    • 7
  • Christian Epe
    • 1
    • 8
  • Achim Harder
    • 9
  • Johan Höglund
    • 10
  • Ronald Kaminsky
    • 8
  • Dominique Kerboeuf
    • 11
  • Ulla Küttler
    • 1
  • Elias Papadopoulos
    • 12
  • Janez Posedi
    • 13
  • John Small
    • 3
  • Marián Várady
    • 14
  • Jozef Vercruysse
    • 15
  • Nicole Wirtherle
    • 16
  1. 1.Institute for ParasitologyUniversity of Veterinary MedicineHannoverGermany
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Veterinary ScienceUniversity of BristolBristolUK
  3. 3.Moredun Research InstituteMidlothianUK
  4. 4.Institute of ParasitologyJustus Liebig UniversityGieβenGermany
  5. 5.Central Veterinary Institute of Wageningen URLelystadThe Netherlands
  6. 6.Department of ParasitologyUludag UniversityBursaTurkey
  7. 7.Institute of Tropical MedicineAntwerpBelgium
  8. 8.Novartis Centre de Recherche Santé AnimaleSt. AubinSwitzerland
  9. 9.BayerHealthcare Animal HealthLeverkusenGermany
  10. 10.Department of Parasitology (SWEPAR)Swedish University of Agricultural SciencesUppsalaSweden
  11. 11.INRANouzillyFrance
  12. 12.Laboratory of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  13. 13.Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of LjubljanaLjubljanaSlovenia
  14. 14.Parasitological InstituteSlovak Academy of ScienceKosiceSlovak Republic
  15. 15.Faculty of Veterinary MedicineGhent UniversityMerelbekeBelgium
  16. 16.Pfizer Animal HealthSandwichUK

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