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Parasitology Research

, 105:769 | Cite as

Citrus essential oils and four enantiomeric pinenes against Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae)

  • Antonios Michaelakis
  • Dimitrios Papachristos
  • Athanasios Kimbaris
  • George Koliopoulos
  • Athanasios Giatropoulos
  • Moschos G. Polissiou
Original Paper

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of pinenes (entantiomers of α- and β-) and essential oils from Greek plants of the Rutaceae family against the mosquito larvae of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae). Essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation from fruit peel of orange (Citrus sinensis L.), lemon (Citrus limon L.), and bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L.). The chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. Citrus essential oils contained in high proportion limonene and in lower quantities p-menthane molecules and pinenes. The insecticidal action of these essential oils and entantiomers of their pinenes on mosquito larvae was evaluated. Plant essential oils exhibited strong toxicity against larvae with the LC50 values ranging from 30.1 (lemon) to 51.5 mg/L (orange) depending on Citrus species and their composition. Finally, the LC50 value of pinenes ranging from 36.53 to 66.52 mg/L indicated an enantioselective toxicity only for the β-pinene entantiomer.

Keywords

West Nile Virus Limonene Sweet Orange Larvicidal Activity Citrus Species 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonios Michaelakis
    • 1
  • Dimitrios Papachristos
    • 1
  • Athanasios Kimbaris
    • 2
  • George Koliopoulos
    • 3
  • Athanasios Giatropoulos
    • 3
  • Moschos G. Polissiou
    • 4
  1. 1.Laboratory of Agricultural Entomology, Department of Entomology and Agricultural Zoology, Benaki Phytopathological InstituteKifissia AthensGreece
  2. 2.Laboratory of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Department of Agricultural DevelopmentDemocritus University of ThraceΝ. OrestiadaGreece
  3. 3.Laboratory of Insecticides of Public Health Importance, Benaki Phytopathological InstituteKifissia AthensGreece
  4. 4.Chemistry LaboratoriesAgricultural University of AthensAthensGreece

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