Parasitology Research

, Volume 103, Issue 5, pp 1159–1162 | Cite as

Evaluation of PCR assay in diagnosis and identification of cutaneous leishmaniasis: a comparison with the parasitological methods

  • Farideh Shahbazi
  • Saed Shahabi
  • Bahram Kazemi
  • Mehdi Mohebali
  • Ali Reza Abadi
  • Zabiholah Zare
Original Paper

Abstract

The aims of this study are to identify Leishmania species and compare and validate internal transcribed spacers (ITS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay against parasitological methods for diagnosing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). We used the ITS-PCR, parasite culture, and microscopic evaluation of stained smears on 155 specimens from suspected cases of (CL) patients who referred to Mashhad Health Centers (northeast Iran). The PCR indicated the sensitivity (98.8%), correctly diagnosing 86 of the 87 confirmed positive specimens. Microscopy and parasite culture alone showed 79.3% sensitivity (69/87 positive) and 86.2% sensitivity (75/87 positive), respectively, while microscopy and culture in combination improved sensitivity totally to 100% (87/87). The results also revealed that Leishmania tropica species is dominant (96.5%) in the studied regions. This study suggests that both the parasitological techniques reliably were used for the diagnosis of CL, and the ITS-PCR assay without using RFLP analysis is useful for identifying Leishmania species in the area.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Farideh Shahbazi
    • 1
  • Saed Shahabi
    • 1
  • Bahram Kazemi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mehdi Mohebali
    • 3
  • Ali Reza Abadi
    • 4
  • Zabiholah Zare
    • 3
  1. 1.Parasitology DepartmentShahid Beheshti Medical UniversityTehranIran
  2. 2.Cellular and Molecular Biology Research CenterShahid Beheshti Medical UniversityTehranIran
  3. 3.Parasitology Department, School of Public HealthTehran Medical UniversityTehranIran
  4. 4.Medical Social DepartmentShahid Beheshti Medical UniversityTehranIran

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