Parasitology Research

, Volume 102, Issue 3, pp 547–550 | Cite as

Plasmodium malariae infection in spite of previous anti-malarial medication

  • Irmela Müller-Stöver
  • Jaco J. Verweij
  • Barbara Hoppenheit
  • Klaus Göbels
  • Dieter Häussinger
  • Joachim Richter
Short Communication

Abstract

Plasmodium malariae is regarded as usually being susceptible to all anti-malarials whether applied for prophylaxis or treatment. We report on three cases of P. malariae infection which occurred 12–14 weeks after anti-malarial chemoprophylaxis or treatment with mefloquine or atovaquone/proguanil. The most likely explanation for the failure of mefloquine and atovaquone/proguanil to prevent quartan malaria occurring some months later is the insufficient effect on the particularly long-lasting pre-erythrocytic development stages of P. malariae.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irmela Müller-Stöver
    • 1
  • Jaco J. Verweij
    • 2
  • Barbara Hoppenheit
    • 1
  • Klaus Göbels
    • 1
  • Dieter Häussinger
    • 1
  • Joachim Richter
    • 1
  1. 1.Tropenmedizinische Ambulanz, Klinik für Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und InfektiologieUniversitätsklinikum DüsseldorfDüsseldorfGermany
  2. 2.Department of Parasitology, Department of Medical MicrobiologyLeiden University Medical CenterLeidenThe Netherlands

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