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Parasitology Research

, Volume 101, Supplement 2, pp 207–216 | Cite as

Status of tick distribution in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan

  • Srikant Ghosh
  • Gyan Chand Bansal
  • Suresh Chandra Gupta
  • Debdatta Ray
  • Muhammad Qasim Khan
  • Hamid Irshad
  • Md. Shahiduzzaman
  • Ulrike Seitzer
  • Jabbar S. Ahmed
Original Paper

Abstract

On a global basis, ticks transmit a greater variety of pathogenic microorganisms, protozoa, rickettsiae, spirochaets, and viruses than any other arthropods and are among the most important vectors of diseases affecting livestock, humans, and companion animals. Ticks and tick-borne diseases (TTBDs) affect 80% of the world cattle population and are widely distributed throughout the world, particularly in tropical and subtropical countries including India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Ticks and tick-transmitted infections have coevolved with various wild animal hosts, which constitute the reservoir hosts for ticks and tick-borne pathogens of livestock, pets, and humans. In this region, the livestock sector is suffering from a number of disease problems caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Among the parasitological problems, the damage caused by TTBDs is considered very high, and the control of TTBDs has been given priority.

Keywords

Tick Species Babesia Tick Infestation Babesiosis Ixodid Tick 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was funded in part by the EU-coordinated action ICTTD-3 (contract no. IC18-CT95-0009).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Srikant Ghosh
    • 1
  • Gyan Chand Bansal
    • 1
  • Suresh Chandra Gupta
    • 1
  • Debdatta Ray
    • 1
  • Muhammad Qasim Khan
    • 2
  • Hamid Irshad
    • 2
  • Md. Shahiduzzaman
    • 3
  • Ulrike Seitzer
    • 4
  • Jabbar S. Ahmed
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of ParasitologyIndian Veterinary Research InstituteIzatnagarIndia
  2. 2.Animal Health Laboratories, Animal Sciences InstituteNational Agricultural Research CentreIslamabadPakistan
  3. 3.Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary ScienceBangladesh Agricultural UniversityMymensinghBangladesh
  4. 4.Division of Veterinary Infection Biology and ImmunologyResearch Center BorstelBorstelGermany

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