Parasitology Research

, Volume 101, Issue 5, pp 1285–1288 | Cite as

Determination of potential risk factors associated with Theileria annulata and Theileria parva infections of cattle in the Sudan

  • D. A. Salih
  • A. M. EL Hussein
  • M. N. Kyule
  • K.-H. Zessin
  • J. S. Ahmed
  • U. Seitzer
Original Paper

Abstract

A multi-variate logistic regression analysis was performed on two sets of data on the prevalence of Theileria annulata in Northern Sudan and Theileria parva in Southern Sudan, to determine the potential risk factors that might affect the distribution of the infections in those regions. The logistic regression model was fit with the tested risk factors for each disease, separately. The results indicated that locations, management systems and age could be held as risk factors for T. annulata infection in Northern Sudan, while for T. parva locations and seasons could be held as risk factors in Southern Sudan. The results of this study will assist in the development of more effective control strategies for smallholder dairy farms in the country.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the International Foundation for Science, Stockholm, Sweden, and the Organisation of Islamic Conference Standing Committee on Scientific and Technological Cooperation (COMSTECH), Islamabad, Pakistan, through a grant (IFS grant 3765-1) to Mr. Diaeldin Ahmed SALIH. This work has been facilitated through The Integrated Consortium on Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases (ICTTD-3) financed by the International Cooperation Programme of the European Union through Coordination Action Project no. 510561. We declare that the experiments performed and presented in this report comply with the current laws of the Federal Republic of Germany and Sudan. This work is published with the kind permission of the Director-General, Animal Resources Research Corporation, Sudan.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. A. Salih
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. M. EL Hussein
    • 2
  • M. N. Kyule
    • 3
  • K.-H. Zessin
    • 3
  • J. S. Ahmed
    • 1
  • U. Seitzer
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Veterinary Infection Biology and ImmunologyResearch Center BorstelBorstelGermany
  2. 2.Central Veterinary Research LaboratoriesKhartoumSudan
  3. 3.Faculty of Veterinary MedicineFree University of BerlinBerlinGermany

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