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Parasitology Research

, Volume 100, Issue 2, pp 395–400 | Cite as

Redescription of Trypanosoma siniperca Chang 1964 from freshwater fish of China based on morphological and molecular data

  • Zemao Gu
  • Jianguo Wang
  • Ming Li
  • Jinyong Zhang
  • Xiaoning Gong
Original Paper

Abstract

During the parasite fauna investigation within 2005, the freshwater fish trypanosome Trypanosoma siniperca Chang 1964 was isolated from the blood of Mandarin carp (Siniperca chuatsi) from Niushan Lake, Hubei Province, central China. Blood trypomastigotes were observed only, and the density of infection was low. Light microscopy examinations of this material made it possible to study in detail the morphology of this parasite and redescribe it according to current standards. T. siniperca is characterized also on the molecular level using the sequences of SSU rRNA gene. Phylogenetic analyses based on these sequences allowed clearer phylogenetic relationships to be established with other fish trypanosomes sequenced to date.

Keywords

Hubei Province Trypanosoma Undulate Membrane Trypomastigote Form Free Flagellum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are much grateful to Prof. L. X. Li and Dr. Aihua Li of the Institute of Hydrobiology, the Chinese Academy of Sciences for identifying the species of fish trypanosomes and revising the text, respectively. This work was supported by the “Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KSCX2-1-04)” and “Hubei Gong Guan Programme (Grant No. 2006 AA 201B27)”.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zemao Gu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jianguo Wang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Ming Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jinyong Zhang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Xiaoning Gong
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratory of Healthy AquacultureInstitute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of SciencesWuhanPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Graduate SchoolChinese Academy of SciencesWuhanPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Research Center of Fisheries BiotechnologyInstitute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of SciencesWuhanPeople’s Republic of China

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