Parasitology Research

, Volume 95, Issue 6, pp 427–429

Repellent efficiency of BayRepel against Culicoides impunctatus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

  • S. Carpenter
  • K. Eyres
  • I. McEndrick
  • L. Smith
  • J. Turner
  • W. Mordue
  • A. J. Mordue (Luntz)
Short Communication

Abstract

A new insect repellent, BayRepel, containing the active ingredient KBR 3023, was examined for repellent efficiency against the biting midge Culicoides impunctatus Goetghebuer. Assessments were made using landing rates on the forearms of five human subjects with two treatment concentrations of BayRepel and also an alternative repellent, Mosi-guard. BayRepel was found to significantly reduce landing rates for over 8 h, but with a significant reduction in efficiency at 2–4 h post-application. Increasing the dose of BayRepel led to a significantly greater protection at 8 h post-application, reducing landing rates by 75.8±8.5%. No significant differences were found in protection levels between individuals.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Carpenter
    • 1
  • K. Eyres
    • 1
  • I. McEndrick
    • 1
  • L. Smith
    • 1
  • J. Turner
    • 1
  • W. Mordue
    • 1
  • A. J. Mordue (Luntz)
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of AberdeenAberdeen UK

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