Parasitology Research

, Volume 98, Issue 4, pp 299–303 | Cite as

First studies on the susceptibility of Omphiscola glabra (Gastropoda: Lymnaeidae) from central France to Fascioloides magna

  • D. Rondelaud
  • A. Novobilský
  • P. Vignoles
  • P. Treuil
  • B. Koudela
  • G. Dreyfuss
OriginalPaper

Abstract

Experimental infections of Omphiscola glabra (preadult snails), originating from central France, to a Czech isolate of Fascioloides magna miracidia were carried out to determine if the local populations of O. glabra may ensure the larval development of this parasite and to compare these results with those noted for a natural snail host, Galba truncatula. The presence of experimentally infected snails was noted in the six populations of snails studied. However, only a few snails shed their cercariae (O. glabra 5.3 to 17.1%, G.truncatula 15.1% in the first population, and no shedding in the other). The shell heights of cercariae-shedding (CS) snails were significantly greater than those of other infected snails, for O. glabra as well as for G. truncatula. The number of metacercariae noted in each snail group was low and showed insignificant variations. When experimental infections of O. glabra were performed in relation to the shell height of snails (from 1 to 14 mm) at miracidial exposure, the prevalence of infected snails significantly decreased with increasing shell heights at exposure. However, the presence of CS snails was only noted from the 5–6 to the 9–10 mm groups, and the mean number of metacercariae per group ranged from 27 to 44.2. Despite the high infectivity of the Czech isolate of F. magna miracidia, there was an incomplete adaptation with the French G. truncatula and O. glabra used in this study, as the metacercarial production was low, and cercarial shedding only occurred for snails which showed a strong increase of their shell height during F. magna infections.

References

  1. Abrous M, Roumieux L, Dreyfuss G, Rondelaud D, Mage C (1998) Proposition d’une technique simple pour la production métacercarienne de Fasciola hepatica Linné à partir du mollusque Lymnaea truncatula Müller. Rev Med Vet (Toul) 149:943–948Google Scholar
  2. Chroustová E (1979) Experimental infection of Lymnaea palustris snails with Fascioloides magna. Vet Parasitol 5:57–64CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Dunkel AM, Rognlie MC, Johnson GR, Knapp SE (1996) Distribution of potential intermediate hosts for Fasciola hepatica and Fascioloides magna in Montana, USA. Vet Parasitol 62:63–70PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Erhardová-Kotrlá B (1971) The occurrence of Fascioloides magna (Bassi, 1875) in Czechoslovakia. Academia, PragueGoogle Scholar
  5. Gasnier N, Rondelaud D, Abrous M, Boulard C, Carreras F, Diez-Banos P, Cabaret J (2000) Allopatric combination of Fasciola hepatica and Lymnaea truncatula is more efficient than sympatric ones. Int J Parasitol 30:573–578PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Goumghar MD, Dreyfuss G, Rondelaud D, Benlemlih M, Cabaret J (2001) More efficient allopatric combinations of Fasciola hepatica and Lymnaea truncatula due to modification of redial development? Parasitol Res 87:1016–1019PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Hirtová L, Modrý D, Faltýnková A (2003) Epizootiology of fascioloidosis in a fenced heard of fallow deer (Dama dama). Helminthologia 40:180Google Scholar
  8. Hubendick B (1951) Recent Lymnaeidae. Their variation, morphology, taxonomy, nomenclature and distribution. Klung Svenska Vetenskapsakad Handl 3:1–223Google Scholar
  9. Rondelaud D, Denève C, Belfaiza M, Mekroud A, Abrous M, Moncef M, Dreyfuss G (2004) Variability in the prevalences of infections and cercarial production in Galba truncatula raised on a high quality diet. Parasitol Res 92:242–245PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Špakulová M, Rajský D, Sokol J, Vodňanský M (2003) Giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna), an important liver parasite of ruminants. Parpress, Brastislava, pp 14–23Google Scholar
  11. Stat-Itcf (1988) Manuel d’utilisation. Institut technique des céréales et des fourrages, Service des études statistiques, BoignevilleGoogle Scholar
  12. Swales WE (1935) The life cycle of Fascioloides magna (Bassi, 1875), the large liver fluke of ruminants in Canada with observations on the bionomics of the larval stages and the intermediate hosts, pathology of fascioloidiasis magna, and control measures. Can J Res 12:177–215Google Scholar
  13. Vareille-Morel C, Dreyfuss G, Rondelaud D (1999) The characteristics of habitats colonized by three species of Lymnaea in swampy meadows on acid soil: their interest for fasciolosis control. Ann Limnol 35:173–178CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Rondelaud
    • 1
  • A. Novobilský
    • 2
  • P. Vignoles
    • 1
  • P. Treuil
    • 1
  • B. Koudela
    • 2
    • 3
  • G. Dreyfuss
    • 1
  1. 1.UPRES EA 3174/USC INRAFaculty of Medicine and Faculty of PharmacyLimogesFrance
  2. 2.University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical SciencesBrnoCzech Republic
  3. 3.Institute of ParasitologyAcademy of Sciences of the Czech RepublicČeské BudějoviceCzech Republic

Personalised recommendations