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Research in Experimental Medicine

, Volume 198, Issue 2, pp 93–99 | Cite as

Inhibitory effect of Hesperidin on tumour initiation and promotion in mouse skin

  • Bülent Berkarda
  • Hülya Koyuncu
  • Gürsel SoybirEmail author
  • Fikret Baykut
Article

Abstract

A flavonoid, Hesperidin was evaluated for its ability to inhibit tumour initiation by a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and tumour promotion by a phorbol ester in the skin of CD-1 mice. Subcutaneous application of Hes-peridin did not inhibit 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced tumour initiation but did inhibit 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-phorbol acetate-induced tumour promotion. Results provide evidence for a potential chemopreventive activity of Hesperidin.

Keywords

Hesperidin Skin tumorigenesis Mice 

Abbreviations

DMBA

7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene

TPA

12-O-tetra-decanoyl-13-phorbol acetate

FOR

free oxygen radicals

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bülent Berkarda
    • 1
  • Hülya Koyuncu
    • 2
  • Gürsel Soybir
    • 3
    Email author
  • Fikret Baykut
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of HaematologyIstanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medical SchoolIstanbulTurkey
  2. 2.Oncology InstituteIstanbul UniversityIstanbulTurkey
  3. 3.Department of SurgeryTaksim State HospitalIstanbulTurkey
  4. 4.Department of Biomedical EngineeringIstanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medical SchoolIstanbulTurkey

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