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Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology

, Volume 123, Issue 10, pp 539–545 | Cite as

Diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of N1,N8-diacetylspermidine and N1,N12-diacetylspermine in urine as novel markers of malignancy

  • Kyoko Hiramatsu
  • Masayuki Sugimoto
  • Sachiko Kamei
  • Masato Hoshino
  • Kenji Kinoshita
  • Kentaro Iwasaki
  • Masao Kawakita
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

Recently, we found N1,N8-diacetylspermidine (Ac2Spd) and N1,N12-diacetylspermine (Ac2Spm) in human urine, and noted that their amount increased significantly in patients with urogenital malignancies. Previous findings that simultaneous reference to these diacetylpolyamines is useful in distinguishing cancer patients from healthy persons were confirmed by more recent analytical data on urine samples from several cancer patients. Further examination revealed that urinary Ac2Spm and Ac2Spd tended to decrease when cancer patients were treated and entered partial remission. In cases where the Ac2Spm and Ac2Spd levels were normal or near-normal after treatments, the prognosis of the patients was generally good. In contrast, when their level remained far above the normal limits after apparently effective treatment, the prognosis of the patients was poor. When a patient is in remission for more than 3 years, urinary levels of both Ac2Spm and Ac2Spd are stabilized and stay below the normal limits, with rare exceptions. The recurrence of a cancer as well as the complication of a second one during the period of follow-up examination was accompanied by elevation of urinary diacetylpolyamines. These observations indicate that urinary Ac2Spm and Ac2Spd are useful as prognostic indicators after treatment and during follow-up examination of cancer patients.

Key words Diacetylpolyamine Polyamine Tumor marker Urine Urogenital malignancy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kyoko Hiramatsu
    • 1
  • Masayuki Sugimoto
    • 3
  • Sachiko Kamei
    • 4
  • Masato Hoshino
    • 1
  • Kenji Kinoshita
    • 2
  • Kentaro Iwasaki
    • 1
  • Masao Kawakita
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiological Chemistry, The Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 3-18-22 Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan Tel.: +81 3 3823 2101 ext. 5285 Fax: +81 3 3823 2965JP
  2. 2.Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, 3-18-22 Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, JapanJP
  3. 3.Kanto Rosai Hospital, 2035 Kizuki-Sumiyoshi-cho, Nakahara-ku, Kawasaki 211, JapanJP
  4. 4.School of Allied Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, JapanJP

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