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Phosphorylase kinase β affects colorectal cancer cell growth and represents a novel prognostic biomarker

  • Guanghui Wang
  • Wenbin Shen
  • Chen-ying Liu
  • Yun Liu
  • Tingyu Wu
  • Ximao Cui
  • Tong Yu
  • Yilian Zhu
  • Jinglue Song
  • Peng DuEmail author
  • Long CuiEmail author
Original Article – Cancer Research
  • 222 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

To study the expression and intracellular localization of phosphorylase kinase β (PHKβ) protein in colorectal cancers (CRCs), analyze its correlation with clinicopathological features and prognosis, and study the biological roles and mechanism-of-action of PHKβ in CRC cell lines.

Methods

Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blot assays were performed to compare the expressions of PHKβ mRNA and protein in CRC tissues and matched normal mucosa. Tissue microarrays and immunohistochemical staining were performed to detect the expression and intracellular location of PHKβ protein and analyze its correlation with the clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis in CRC patients. Proliferation, cell cycle, wound healing, and xenograft models were used to elucidate the potential role of PHKβ in vitro and in vivo.

Results

PHKβ mRNA and protein were found to be overexpressed in CRC tissue compared to the levels in normal mucosa. Positive expression of PHKβ was significantly correlated with TNM stage and distal metastasis, and elevated expression of PHKβ was an independent prognostic factor in patients with CRC. PHKβ knockdown impaired proliferation of CRC in vitro and in vivo and induced cell cycle arrest.

Conclusions

PHKβ affects CRC cell growth and represents a novel prognostic biomarker.

Keywords

Colorectal cancer PHKβ Prognosis, cell cycle Proliferation 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Funding

This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 81372636 and No. 81302089), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (863 Program) (Grant No. SQ2014SFOZD00314), the Shanghai Excellent Young Teachers Program (Grant No. ZZjdyx13074).

Conflict of interest

Author declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All applicable international, national, and/or institutional guidelines for the care and use of animals were followed. All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guanghui Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wenbin Shen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chen-ying Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yun Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tingyu Wu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ximao Cui
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tong Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yilian Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jinglue Song
    • 1
    • 2
  • Peng Du
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Long Cui
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Xinhua HospitalShanghai Jiao Tong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Shanghai Colorectal Cancer Research CenterShanghaiChina

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