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Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology

, Volume 135, Issue 2, pp 191–195 | Cite as

Beta-hCG/LH receptor (b-HCG/LH-R) expression is increased in invasive versus preinvasive breast cancer: implications for breast carcinogenesis?

  • Gernot Hudelist
  • Pia Wuelfing
  • Klaus Czerwenka
  • Martin Knöfler
  • Sandra Haider
  • Anneliese Fink-Retter
  • Daphne Gschwantler-Kaulich
  • Georg Pfeiler
  • Ernst Kubista
  • Christian F. SingerEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Introduction

The role of the b-HCG/LH/LH-R system in breast cancer is conflicting. Whereas some reports suggest a protective effect of b-HCG on breast epithelium, vitro studies implicate a role of b-HCG/LH-R in the development and growth of breast tumors.

Material and methods

In order to further investigate a possible involvement of b-HCG/LH-R in breast carcinogenesis, immunofluorescence analyses of b-HCG/LH-R expression was performed on 70 preinvasive and adjacent invasive breast cancer specimen using tissue microarrays (TMAs).

Results

In 37 preinvasive samples available for further analysis, b-HCG/LH-R was found in 8/37 samples (21.6%; weak, intermediate and strong staining in 4/37 (10.8%), 2/37 (5.4%) and 2/37 (5.4%). In contrast, b-HCG/LH-R expression was observed in 19/27 (70.4%) adjacent invasive specimen with weak, moderate and strong immunostaining in 10/27 (37.0%), 6/27 (22.2%) and 3/27 (11.1%), respectively. This was statistically significant when compared to preinvasive components (= 0.001, Chi Square Test).

Conclusions

Based on the observation that b-HCG/LH-R was found to be selectively upregulated in invasive tumor components, we suggest that under certain circumstances, sensitivity of ductal cells to hormones that target b-HCG/LH-R could favour mammary carcinogenesis.

Keywords

HCG receptor Breast cancer DCIS Invasive 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to thank Barbara Weidinger and Martha Weinhaeusl for technical assistance with the immunohistochemical procedures.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gernot Hudelist
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pia Wuelfing
    • 3
  • Klaus Czerwenka
    • 4
  • Martin Knöfler
    • 5
  • Sandra Haider
    • 5
  • Anneliese Fink-Retter
    • 1
  • Daphne Gschwantler-Kaulich
    • 1
  • Georg Pfeiler
    • 1
  • Ernst Kubista
    • 1
  • Christian F. Singer
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Division of Special Gynecology, Department of OB/GYNVienna Medical UniversityViennaAustria
  2. 2.Department of OB/GYN LKH VillachVienna Medical UniversityViennaAustria
  3. 3.Department of Obstetrics and GynaecologyMedical University of MuensterMuensterGermany
  4. 4.Department of Clinical Pathology/GynaecopathologyMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  5. 5.Division of Obstetrics and GynecologyMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria

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