Elevated risk of colorectal cancer associated with the AA genotype of the cyclin D1 A870G polymorphism in an Indian population

  • Jing Jiang
  • Jingweng Wang
  • Sadao Suzuki
  • Vendhan Gajalakshmi
  • Kiyonori Kuriki
  • Yang Zhao
  • Seiichi Nakamura
  • Susumu Akasaka
  • Hideki Ishikawa
  • Shinkan Tokudome
Original Paper

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate whether the common cyclin D1 (CCND1) A870G polymorphism is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) in an Indian population. Methods: In this study, 301 newly diagnosed CRC patients and 291 healthy control subjects were genotyped by the PCR-RFLP method. Genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls, and the association of genotypes with CRC was studied. Results: The CCND1 870 A allele was more frequently observed in CRC patients than controls (0.63 vs. 0.56, P=0.01), and after adjustment for age, sex, smoking habits, family history, family income and the consumption of meat, fish, vegetables and fruit, an increased risk was observed for the AA genotype compared to the GG+AG genotype (OR=1.56; 95% CI: 1.10–2.21). The increased risk were also found for colon (OR=1.96; 95% CI: 1.08–3.57) and rectal cancer (OR=1.51; 95% CI: 1.04–2.19). No correlation was observed between genotypes and age of diagnosis of CRC (49.9, 48.7 and 49.4 years for the GG, AG and AA genotypes, respectively; P=0.84). Multivariate analysis also revealed a stronger positive association with the AA genotype among patients with high meat intake (OR=2.67; 95% CI: 1.29–5.51), and particularly significant inverse associations with the GG+AG genotypes were also found for those with high vegetable consumption (OR=0.46; 95% CI: 0.27–0.79 of 2–3 servings/day, and OR=0.31; 95% CI: 0.18–0.53 for >3 servings/day) and fish intake (OR=0.48; 95% CI: 0.28–0.82). Conclusion: These data support the hypothesis that the CCND1 A870G polymorphism may increase the risk of CRC in our Indian population.

Keywords

Colorectal cancer Cyclin D1 A870G polymorphism 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by the International Scientific Research Program, Special Cancer Research of the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. We thank Drs. V. Shanta and. T. Rajkumar at the Cancer Institute, Chennai, India for their cooperation.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jing Jiang
    • 1
  • Jingweng Wang
    • 1
  • Sadao Suzuki
    • 1
  • Vendhan Gajalakshmi
    • 2
  • Kiyonori Kuriki
    • 1
    • 3
  • Yang Zhao
    • 1
  • Seiichi Nakamura
    • 4
  • Susumu Akasaka
    • 5
  • Hideki Ishikawa
    • 6
  • Shinkan Tokudome
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Health Promotion and Preventive MedicineNagoya City University Graduate School of Medical SciencesNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Epidemiological Research CenterChennaiIndia
  3. 3.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and PreventionAichi Cancer Center Research InstituteNagoyaJapan
  4. 4.Health Research FoundationKyotoJapan
  5. 5.Department of Occupational HealthOsaka Prefectural Institute of Public HealthOsakaJapan
  6. 6.Department of Molecular-Targeting Cancer Prevention, Graduate School of Medical ScienceKyoto Prefectural University of MedicineKyotoJapan

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