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European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 169, Issue 4, pp 509–511 | Cite as

Non-accidental chlorpyrifos poisoning—an unusual cause of profound unconsciousness

  • Jiun-Chang Lee
  • Kuang-Lin Lin
  • Jainn-Jim Lin
  • Shao-Hsuan Hsia
  • Chang-Teng Wu
Short Report

Abstract

Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus anticholinesterase insecticide, and organophosphate intoxication can induce symptoms such as miosis, urination, diarrhea, diaphoresis, lacrimation, excitation of central nervous system, salivation, and consciousness disturbance (MUDDLES). Although accidental poisoning of children with drugs and chemicals is a common cause for consciousness disturbance in children, the possibility of deliberate poisoning is rarely considered. We report on a healthy 5-year 6-month-old boy with recurrent organophosphate intoxication. Reports of chlorpyrifos intoxication in children are quite rare. This case report demonstrates decision-making process and how to disclose deliberate chlorpyrifos poisoning of the toddler by the stepmother, another example of Munchausen syndrome by proxy.

Keywords

Cholinesterase deficiency Organophosphate intoxication Child abuse Munchausen syndrome by proxy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jiun-Chang Lee
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kuang-Lin Lin
    • 1
  • Jainn-Jim Lin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shao-Hsuan Hsia
    • 2
  • Chang-Teng Wu
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Pediatric Neurology, Chang Gung Children’s Hospital and Chang Gung Memorial HospitalChang Gung University College of MedicineTaoyuanTaiwan
  2. 2.Division of Pediatric Critical and Emergency Medicine, Chang Gung Children’s Hospital and Chang Gung Memorial HospitalChang Gung University College of MedicineTaoyuanTaiwan

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