Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in a baby with hyper-IgE syndrome

  • Ben Zion Garty
  • Adit Ben-Baruch
  • Asaf Rolinsky
  • Cristina Woellner
  • Bodo Grimbacher
  • Nufar Marcus
Original Paper

Abstract

A 4-month-old baby with a family history of hyper-IgE syndrome acquired Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. The patient’s hyper-IgE syndrome score was low, but a genetic study yielded a STAT3 mutation. P. jirovecii pneumonia can be added to the infections associated with hyper-IgE syndrome. In some cases, it may be the presenting manifestation of this immunodeficiency.

Keywords

Hyper-IgE syndrome Pneumocystis jirovecii Immunodeficiency STAT3 mutation 

Abbreviations

HIES

Hyper-IgE syndrome

PCR

Polymerase chain reaction

P

Pneumocystis

NK

Natural killer

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ben Zion Garty
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Adit Ben-Baruch
    • 4
  • Asaf Rolinsky
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Cristina Woellner
    • 5
  • Bodo Grimbacher
    • 5
  • Nufar Marcus
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics BSchneider Children’s Medical Center of IsraelPetah TiqwaIsrael
  2. 2.Kipper Institute of Allergy and ImmunologySchneider Children’s Medical Center of IsraelPetah TiqwaIsrael
  3. 3.Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  4. 4.Department of Cell Research and ImmunologyTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  5. 5.Department of Immunology and Molecular Pathology, Royal Free HospitalUniversity CollegeLondonUK

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