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HIV prevalence and route of transmission in Turkish immigrants living in North-Rhine Westphalia, Germany

  • Eugen Schülter
  • Mark Oette
  • Melanie Balduin
  • Stefan Reuter
  • Jürgen Rockstroh
  • Gerd Fätkenheuer
  • Stefan Esser
  • Thomas Lengauer
  • Ali Agacfidan
  • Herbert Pfister
  • Rolf Kaiser
  • Baki AkgülEmail author
Original Investigation

Abstract

The high number of Turkish immigrants in the German state North-Rhine Westphalia (NRW) compelled us to look for HIV-infected patients with Turkish nationality. In the AREVIR database, we found 127 (107 men, 20 women) Turkish HIV patients living in NRW. In order to investigate transmission clusters and their correlation to gender, nationality and self-reported transmission mode, a phylogenetic analysis including pol gene sequences was performed. Subtype distribution and the number of HIV drug resistance mutations in the Turkish patient group were found to be similar to the proportion in the non-Turkish patients. Great differences were observed in self-reported mode of transmission in the heterosexual Turkish male subgroup. Neighbour-joining tree of pol gene sequences gave indication that 59% of these reported heterosexual transmissions cluster with those of men having sex with men in the database. This is the first study analysing HIV type distribution, drug resistance mutations and transmission mode in a Turkish immigrant population.

Keywords

HIV-1 Antiretroviral drug resistance transmission Epidemiology Ethnic group 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The work was supported by grants from the Bundesministerium für Gesundheit (BMG IST-4-027173-STP/IIA5-2010AUK361), Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF 01ES0712, BMBF 0315480C) and EURESIST GEIE and EU-Project CHAIN (EU-223131). The authors wish to thank Dörte Hammerschmidt and Monika Timmen-Wego for excellent technical assistance.

Supplementary material

430_2011_193_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (16 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 16 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eugen Schülter
    • 1
  • Mark Oette
    • 2
  • Melanie Balduin
    • 1
  • Stefan Reuter
    • 3
  • Jürgen Rockstroh
    • 4
  • Gerd Fätkenheuer
    • 5
  • Stefan Esser
    • 6
  • Thomas Lengauer
    • 7
  • Ali Agacfidan
    • 8
  • Herbert Pfister
    • 1
  • Rolf Kaiser
    • 1
  • Baki Akgül
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute of Virology, University of CologneCologneGermany
  2. 2.Clinic for General Medicine, Gastroenterology, and Infectious DiseasesAugustinerinnen HospitalCologneGermany
  3. 3.Department of GastroenterologyUniversity of DüsseldorfDüsseldorfGermany
  4. 4.Department of Medicine IUniversity of BonnBonnGermany
  5. 5.Department of Internal Medicine IUniversity of CologneCologneGermany
  6. 6.Department of DermatologyUniversity of Duisburg-EssenEssenGermany
  7. 7.Department of Computational Biology and Applied AlgorithmicsMax Planck Institute for InformaticsSaarbrückenGermany
  8. 8.Department of Microbiology and Clinical MicrobiologyIstanbul Faculty of Medicine, University of IstanbulIstanbulTurkey

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