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Medical Microbiology and Immunology

, Volume 192, Issue 4, pp 193–195 | Cite as

Long-term benzimidazole treatment of alveolar echinococcosis with hematogenic subcutaneous and bone dissemination

  • Urban J. ScheuringEmail author
  • Hanns Martin Seitz
  • Axel Wellmann
  • Joachim H. Hartlapp
  • Dennis Tappe
  • Klaus Brehm
  • Ulrich Spengler
  • Tilmann Sauerbruch
  • Jürgen K. Rockstroh
Original Investigation

Abstract

We report a case of advanced alveolar echinococcosis (AE) that presented like a malignant tumor. It was diagnosed histologically from a subcutaneous nodule with skin inflammation on the right leg. Additionally, the patient showed bone metastases in the lower thoracic spine and the left third toe. This is the first case with proven hematogenic spread of AE to a subcutaneous site. The patient was treated with albendazole and remained stable for 6 years. When progression of AE occurred the therapy was changed to mebendazole, resulting in a stable condition for further 4 years.

Keywords

Alveolar echinococcosis Echinococcus multilocularis larva infection Subcutaneous involvement Bone involvement Albendazole/mebendazole 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Urban J. Scheuring
    • 1
    Email author
  • Hanns Martin Seitz
    • 2
  • Axel Wellmann
    • 3
  • Joachim H. Hartlapp
    • 4
  • Dennis Tappe
    • 5
  • Klaus Brehm
    • 5
  • Ulrich Spengler
    • 6
  • Tilmann Sauerbruch
    • 6
  • Jürgen K. Rockstroh
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Hematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases and RheumatologyJ. W. Goethe University HospitalFrankfurtGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Medical ParasitologyUniversity of BonnBonnGermany
  3. 3.Institute of PathologyUniversity of BonnBonnGermany
  4. 4.Department of Oncology and HematologyStädtische Kliniken OsnabrückOsnabrückGermany
  5. 5.Institute of Hygiene and MicrobiologyUniversity of WürzburgWürzburgGermany
  6. 6.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity Hospital BonnBonnGermany

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