Brain Structure and Function

, Volume 220, Issue 1, pp 501–512

Functional changes during working memory in Huntington’s disease: 30-month longitudinal data from the IMAGE-HD study

  • Govinda R. Poudel
  • Julie C. Stout
  • Juan F. Domínguez D
  • Marcus A. Gray
  • Louisa Salmon
  • Andrew Churchyard
  • Phyllis Chua
  • Beth Borowsky
  • Gary F. Egan
  • Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00429-013-0670-z

Cite this article as:
Poudel, G.R., Stout, J.C., Domínguez D, J.F. et al. Brain Struct Funct (2015) 220: 501. doi:10.1007/s00429-013-0670-z

Abstract

We characterized 30-month longitudinal change in functional activation and connectivity during working memory in premanifest (pre-HD) and symptomatic (symp-HD) Huntington’s disease (HD). In a case–control longitudinal study (baseline, 18 months, and 30 months), we compared change in fMRI activity over time during working memory in 22 pre-HD, 11 symp-HD, and 20 control participants. Outcome measures were BOLD (blood-oxygen-level-dependent) activity during 1-BACK and 2-BACK working memory and functional connectivity between dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and caudate. Compared with controls, the pre-HD group showed significantly increased activation longitudinally during 1-BACK in the left DLPFC and medial frontal cortex, and further increased activation during 2-BACK in the bilateral caudate, putamen, and temporal cortex. Longitudinal change in symp-HD was not significantly different from controls. Longitudinal changes in pre-HD were associated with disease burden and years to onset. The pre-HD group showed longitudinal decreased functional connectivity between left DLPFC and caudate during both 1-BACK and 2-BACK performance. We provide an evidence for longitudinal changes in BOLD activity during working memory prior to clinical manifestations of HD. The ability to increase activation in the prefrontal cortex over time may represent an early compensatory response during the premanifest stage, which may reflect an early marker for clinically relevant functional changes in HD.

Keywords

Functional connectivity fMRI Huntington’s disease Longitudinal Working memory 

Supplementary material

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Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 32 kb)
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Supplementary material 2 (DOCX 48 kb)
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Supplementary material 3 (DOCX 17 kb)
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Supplementary material 4 (DOCX 20 kb)
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Supplementary material 5 (DOCX 29 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Govinda R. Poudel
    • 1
    • 2
    • 8
  • Julie C. Stout
    • 1
  • Juan F. Domínguez D
    • 1
  • Marcus A. Gray
    • 4
  • Louisa Salmon
    • 1
  • Andrew Churchyard
    • 3
  • Phyllis Chua
    • 1
  • Beth Borowsky
    • 5
  • Gary F. Egan
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Psychology and PsychiatryMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia
  2. 2.Monash Biomedical Imaging (MBI)Monash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.Department of NeurologyMonash Medical CentreClaytonAustralia
  4. 4.Gehrmann Laboratory, Centre for Advanced ImagingThe University of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia
  5. 5.CHDI Management/CHDI FoundationNew YorkUSA
  6. 6.Centre for NeuroscienceUniversity of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia
  7. 7.Howard Florey Institute, Florey Neuroscience InstitutesParkvilleAustralia
  8. 8.VLSCI Life Sciences and Computation CentreCarltonAustralia

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