Virchows Archiv

, Volume 452, Issue 3, pp 305–312 | Cite as

A procedure for tissue freezing and processing applicable to both intra-operative frozen section diagnosis and tissue banking in surgical pathology

  • Susanne Steu
  • Maya Baucamp
  • Gabriela von Dach
  • Marion Bawohl
  • Susanne Dettwiler
  • Martina Storz
  • Holger Moch
  • Peter Schraml
Original Article

Abstract

Different methods for snap freezing surgical human tissue specimens exist. At pathology institutes with higher work loads, solid carbon dioxide, freezing sprays, and cryostat freezing are commonly used as coolants for diagnosing frozen tissue sections, whereas for tissue banking, liquid nitrogen or isopentane cooled with liquid nitrogen is preferred. Freezing tissues for diagnostic and research purposes are therefore often time consuming, laborious, even hazardous, and not user friendly. In tissue banks, frozen tissue samples are stored in cryovials, capsules, cryomolds, or cryocassettes. Tissues are additionally embedded using freezing media or wrapped in plastic bags or aluminum foils to prevent desiccation. The latter method aggravates enormously further tissue handling and processing. Here, we describe an isopentane-based workflow which concurrently facilitates tissue freezing and processing for both routine intra-operative frozen section and tissue banking and satisfies the qualitative demands of pathologists, cancer researchers, laboratory technicians, and tissue bankers.

Keywords

Rapid frozen section Tissue banking Tissue freezing procedures OCT 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Dr. Kirsten Struckmann and Silvia Behnke for their excellent technical support. This study was supported by UBS AG (made possible by an anonymous donor), Zurich Cancer League, and the Foundation Biobank-Suisse. We declare that the experiments comply with the current laws of the Kanton Zürich.

Conflict of interest statement

We declare that we have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susanne Steu
    • 1
  • Maya Baucamp
    • 1
  • Gabriela von Dach
    • 1
  • Marion Bawohl
    • 1
  • Susanne Dettwiler
    • 1
  • Martina Storz
    • 1
  • Holger Moch
    • 1
  • Peter Schraml
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, Institute of Surgical PathologyZurich University HospitalZurichSwitzerland

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