Development Genes and Evolution

, Volume 215, Issue 4, pp 207–212

Allelic expression of IGF2 in live-bearing, matrotrophic fishes

  • Betty R. Lawton
  • Leila Sevigny
  • Craig Obergfell
  • David Reznick
  • Rachel J. O’Neill
  • Michael J. O’Neill
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s00427-004-0463-8

Cite this article as:
Lawton, B.R., Sevigny, L., Obergfell, C. et al. Dev Genes Evol (2005) 215: 207. doi:10.1007/s00427-004-0463-8

Abstract

The parental conflict, or kinship, theory of genomic imprinting predicts that parent-specific gene expression may evolve in species in which parental investment in developing offspring is unequal. This theory explains many aspects of parent-of-origin transcriptional silencing of embryonic growth regulatory genes in mammals, but it has not been tested in any other live-bearing, placental animals. A major embryonic growth promoting gene with conserved function in all vertebrates is insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2). This gene is imprinted in both eutherians and marsupials, as are several genes that modulate IGF2 activity. We have tested for parent-of-origin influences on developmental expression of IGF2 in two poeciliid fish species, Heterandria formosa and Poeciliopsis prolifica, that have evolved placentation independently. We found IGF2 to be expressed bi-allelically throughout embryonic development in both species.

Keywords

Genomic imprinting Placentation Genetic conflict Insulin-like growth factor 2 Poeciliidae 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Betty R. Lawton
    • 1
  • Leila Sevigny
    • 1
  • Craig Obergfell
    • 1
  • David Reznick
    • 2
  • Rachel J. O’Neill
    • 1
  • Michael J. O’Neill
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular and Cell BiologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiologyUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA

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