Planta

, Volume 232, Issue 5, pp 1181–1189 | Cite as

Identifying differentially expressed genes in leaves of Glycine tomentella in the presence of the fungal pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi

  • Ruth Elena Soria-Guerra
  • Sergio Rosales-Mendoza
  • Sungyul Chang
  • James S. Haudenshield
  • Danman Zheng
  • Suryadevara S. Rao
  • Glen L. Hartman
  • Said A. Ghabrial
  • Schuyler S. Korban
Original Article

Abstract

To compare transcription profiles in genotypes of Glycine tomentella that are differentially sensitive to soybean rust, caused by the fungal pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi, four cDNA libraries were constructed using the suppression subtractive hybridization method. Libraries were constructed from rust-infected and non-infected leaves of resistant (PI509501) and susceptible (PI441101) genotypes of G. tomentella, and subjected to subtractive hybridization. A total of 1,536 sequences were obtained from these cDNA libraries from which 195 contigs and 865 singletons were identified. Of these sequenced cDNA clones, functions of 646 clones (61%) were determined. In addition, 160 clones (15%) had significant homology to hypothetical proteins; while the remaining 254 clones (24%) did not reveal any hits. Of those 646 clones with known functions, different genes encoding protein products involved in metabolism, cell defense, energy, protein synthesis, transcription, and cellular transport were identified. These findings were subsequently confirmed by real time RT-PCR and dot blot hybridization.

Keywords

Glycine tomentella Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) Phakopsorapachyrhizi Defense responses Resistance genes 

Supplementary material

425_2010_1251_MOESM1_ESM.doc (478 kb)
Supplementary Table (DOC 479 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth Elena Soria-Guerra
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sergio Rosales-Mendoza
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sungyul Chang
    • 1
  • James S. Haudenshield
    • 3
  • Danman Zheng
    • 1
  • Suryadevara S. Rao
    • 4
  • Glen L. Hartman
    • 1
    • 3
    • 5
  • Said A. Ghabrial
    • 4
  • Schuyler S. Korban
    • 1
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Natural Resources and Environmental SciencesUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA
  2. 2.Facultad de Ciencias QuímicasUniversidad Autónoma de San Luis PotosíSan Luis PotosíMexico
  3. 3.Department of Crop SciencesUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Plant PathologyUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  5. 5.USDA-Agricultural Research ServiceUrbanaUSA
  6. 6.University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbanaUSA

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