Planta

, Volume 232, Issue 5, pp 1033–1043

Plant NAC-type transcription factor proteins contain a NARD domain for repression of transcriptional activation

Original Article

Abstract

Plant-specific transcription factor NAC proteins play essential roles in many biological processes such as development, senescence, morphogenesis, and stress signal transduction pathways. In the NAC family, some members function as transcription activators while others act as repressors. In the present study we found that though the full-length GmNAC20 from soybean did not have transcriptional activation activity, the carboxy-terminal activation domain of GmNAC20 had high transcriptional activation activity in the yeast assay system. Deletion experiments revealed an active repression domain with 35 amino acids, named NARD (NAC Repression Domain), in the d subdomain of NAC DNA-binding domain. NARD can reduce the transcriptional activation ability of diverse transcription factors when fused to either the amino-terminal or the carboxy-terminal of the transcription factors. NARD-like sequences are also present in other NAC family members and they are functional repression domain when fused to VP16 in plant protoplast assay system. Mutation analysis of conserved amino acid residues in NARD showed that the hydrophobic LVFY motif may partially contribute to the repression function. It is hypothesized that the interactions between the repression domain NARD and the carboxy-terminal activation domain may finally determine the ability of NAC family proteins to regulate downstream gene expressions.

Keywords

GmNAC20 LVFY motif NAC family NARD Transcription factor 

Abbreviations

ACC

1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid

ANAC

Arabidopsis NAC

AREB

ABA-responsive element binding protein

C/EBP

CCAAT/enhancer binding protein

DREB/CBF

Dehydration responsive element/C-repeat binding protein

CBNAC

Calmodulin-binding NAC protein

CUC

Cup-shaped cotyledon

ERF

Ethylene response factor

GRAB

Geminivirus Rep A-binding

HRT

Hordeum repressor of transcription

NAC

NAM, ATAF, and CUC

NAM

No apical meristem

NAP

NAC-like, activated by AP3/PI

NARD

NAC repression domain

NST1

NAC secondary wall thickening promoting factor1

ONPG

o-Nitrophenyl β-d-galactopyranoside

PEG

Polyethylene glycol

RD26

Responsive to desiccation 26

SNAC

Stress responsive NAC

X-Gal

5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-d-galactopyranoside

Supplementary material

425_2010_1238_MOESM1_ESM.doc (49 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 49 kb)
425_2010_1238_MOESM2_ESM.doc (24 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOC 24 kb)
425_2010_1238_MOESM3_ESM.ppt (156 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (PPT 156 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Plant Gene Research Center, National Key Laboratory of Plant Genomics, Institute of Genetics and Developmental BiologyChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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