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Planta

, 229:25 | Cite as

An unidentified ultraviolet-B-specific photoreceptor mediates transcriptional activation of the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase gene in plants

  • Motohide Ioki
  • Shinya Takahashi
  • Nobuyoshi NakajimaEmail author
  • Kohei Fujikura
  • Masanori Tamaoki
  • Hikaru Saji
  • Akihiro Kubo
  • Mitsuko Aono
  • Machi Kanna
  • Daisuke Ogawa
  • Jutarou Fukazawa
  • Yoshihisa Oda
  • Seiji Yoshida
  • Masakatsu Watanabe
  • Seiichiro Hasezawa
  • Noriaki Kondo
Original Article

Abstract

Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) constitute a majority of DNA lesions caused by ultraviolet-B (UVB). CPD photolyase, which rapidly repairs CPDs, is essential for plant survival under sunlight containing UVB. Our earlier results that the transcription of the cucumber CPD photolyase gene (CsPHR) was activated by light have prompted us to propose that this light-driven transcriptional activation would allow plants to meet the need of the photolyase activity upon challenges of UVB from sunlight. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the light-dependent transcriptional activation of CsPHR were unknown. In order to understand spectroscopic aspects of the plant response, we investigated the wavelength-dependence (action spectra) of the light-dependent transcriptional activation of CsPHR. In both cucumber seedlings and transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings expressing reporter genes under the control of the CsPHR promoter, the action spectra exhibited the most predominant peak in the long-wavelength UVB waveband (around 310 nm). In addition, a 95-bp cis-acting region in the CsPHR promoter was identified to be essential for the UVB-driven transcriptional activation of CsPHR. Thus, we concluded that the photoperception of long-wavelength UVB by UVB photoreceptor(s) led to the induction of the CsPHR transcription via a conserved cis-acting element.

Keywords

Action spectrum Cucumis Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimmer DNA photolyase (EC 4.1.99.3) Photoreceptor Ultraviolet light 

Abbreviations

CPD

Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer

CsPHR

Cucumber CPD photolyase

GUS

β-Glucronidase

LUC

Luciferase

PcCHS

Parsley chalcone synthase

RT-PCR

Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction

UVA

Ultraviolet-A

UVB

Ultraviolet-B

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to the members of the Large Spectrograph Laboratory at National Institute for Basic Biology (Mr. S. Higashi, Ms. C. Ichikawa and Mr. T. Nakamura), our colleagues at National Institute for Environmental Studies (Mr. and Mrs. Matsumoto, Ms. M. Nakajima, Ms. H. Watanabe, Ms. Y. Oshima, Mr. H. Takahashi, and Mr. T. Teramoto), Dr. Y. Takahashi at the University of Tokyo, and Dr. B. Liu at University of California, Davis, for their generous technical assistance and discussions.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Motohide Ioki
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  • Shinya Takahashi
    • 1
  • Nobuyoshi Nakajima
    • 2
    Email author
  • Kohei Fujikura
    • 1
  • Masanori Tamaoki
    • 2
  • Hikaru Saji
    • 2
  • Akihiro Kubo
    • 2
  • Mitsuko Aono
    • 2
  • Machi Kanna
    • 2
  • Daisuke Ogawa
    • 2
  • Jutarou Fukazawa
    • 1
  • Yoshihisa Oda
    • 3
  • Seiji Yoshida
    • 2
  • Masakatsu Watanabe
    • 4
  • Seiichiro Hasezawa
    • 1
    • 3
  • Noriaki Kondo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of ScienceThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Environmental Biology DivisionNational Institute for Environmental StudiesTsukubaJapan
  3. 3.Graduate School of Frontier SciencesThe University of TokyoKashiwaJapan
  4. 4.National Institute for Basic BiologyOkazakiJapan
  5. 5.Department of Plant BiologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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