Planta

, Volume 218, Issue 3, pp 492–496

Biphenyl synthase from yeast-extract-treated cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia

  • Benye Liu
  • Till Beuerle
  • Tim Klundt
  • Ludger Beerhues
Rapid Communication

Abstract

Biphenyls and dibenzofurans are the phytoalexins of the Maloideae, a subfamily of the economically important Rosaceae. The biphenyl aucuparin accumulated in Sorbus aucuparia L. cell cultures in response to yeast extract treatment. Incubation of cell-free extracts from challenged cell cultures with benzoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA led to the formation of 3,5-dihydroxybiphenyl. This reaction was catalysed by a novel polyketide synthase, which will be named biphenyl synthase. The most efficient starter substrate for the enzyme was benzoyl-CoA. Relatively high activity was also observed with 2-hydroxybenzoyl-CoA but, instead of the corresponding biphenyl, the derailment product 2-hydroxybenzoyltriacetic acid lactone was formed.

Keywords

Aucuparin Benzoic acid Biphenyl synthase Phytoalexin Polyketide synthase Sorbus 

Abbreviations

BIS

biphenyl synthase

BPS

benzophenone synthase

DTT

dithiothreitol

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benye Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Till Beuerle
    • 1
  • Tim Klundt
    • 1
  • Ludger Beerhues
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Pharmazeutische BiologieTechnische Universität BraunschweigBraunschweigGermany
  2. 2.Institute of BotanyChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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