Pflügers Archiv

, Volume 450, Issue 4, pp 201–208

Functional profiling of human atrial and ventricular gene expression

  • Andreas S. Barth
  • Sylvia Merk
  • Elisabeth Arnoldi
  • Ludwig Zwermann
  • Patrick Kloos
  • Mathias Gebauer
  • Klaus Steinmeyer
  • Markus Bleich
  • Stefan Kääb
  • Arne Pfeufer
  • Peter Überfuhr
  • Martin Dugas
  • Gerhard Steinbeck
  • Michael Nabauer
Cardiovascular System

DOI: 10.1007/s00424-005-1404-8

Cite this article as:
Barth, A.S., Merk, S., Arnoldi, E. et al. Pflugers Arch - Eur J Physiol (2005) 450: 201. doi:10.1007/s00424-005-1404-8

Abstract

The purpose of our investigation was to identify the transcriptional basis for ultrastructural and functional specialization of human atria and ventricles. Using exploratory microarray analysis (Affymetrix U133A+B), we detected 11,740 transcripts expressed in human heart, representing the most comprehensive report of the human myocardial transcriptome to date. Variation in gene expression between atria and ventricles accounted for the largest differences in this data set, as 3.300 and 2.974 transcripts showed higher expression in atria and ventricles, respectively. Functional classification based on Gene Ontology identified chamber-specific patterns of gene expression and provided molecular insights into the regional specialization of cardiomyocytes, correlating important functional pathways to transcriptional activity: Ventricular myocytes preferentially express genes satisfying contractile and energetic requirements, while atrial myocytes exhibit specific transcriptional activities related to neurohumoral function. In addition, several pro-fibrotic and apoptotic pathways were concentrated in atrial myocardium, substantiating the higher susceptibility of atria to programmed cell death and extracellular matrix remodelling observed in human and experimental animal models of heart failure. Differences in transcriptional profiles of atrial and ventricular myocardium thus provide molecular insights into myocardial cell diversity and distinct region-specific adaptations to physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Moreover, as major functional classes of atrial- and ventricular-specific transcripts were common to human and murine myocardium, an evolutionarily conserved chamber-specific expression pattern in mammalian myocardium is suggested.

Keywords

Functional genomics Myocardium Atrium Ventricle Signal transduction Contraction 

Supplementary material

Fig. S1 A,B

424_2005_1404_ESM_fig1.pdf (173 kb)
(PDF 174 KB)

Fig S2

424_2005_1404_ESM_fig2.pdf (240 kb)
(PDF 241 KB)

Table S1

424_2005_1404_ESM_table1.pdf (182 kb)
(PDF 183 KB)

Table S2

424_2005_1404_ESM_table2.pdf (178 kb)
(PDF 178 KB)

Table S3

424_2005_1404_ESM_table3.xls (2.2 mb)
(Excel 2.2 MB)

Table S4

424_2005_1404_ESM_table4.pdf (177 kb)
(PDF 177 KB)

Table S5

424_2005_1404_ESM_table5.xls (149 kb)
(Excel 149 KB)

Table S6

424_2005_1404_ESM_table6.xls (1.7 mb)
(Excel 1.7 MB)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andreas S. Barth
    • 1
  • Sylvia Merk
    • 2
  • Elisabeth Arnoldi
    • 1
  • Ludwig Zwermann
    • 1
  • Patrick Kloos
    • 1
  • Mathias Gebauer
    • 3
  • Klaus Steinmeyer
    • 3
  • Markus Bleich
    • 3
    • 4
  • Stefan Kääb
    • 1
  • Arne Pfeufer
    • 5
  • Peter Überfuhr
    • 6
  • Martin Dugas
    • 2
  • Gerhard Steinbeck
    • 1
  • Michael Nabauer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine I, University Hospital GrosshadernLudwig-Maximilians-UniversityMunichGermany
  2. 2.Department of Medical Informatics, Biometrics and Epidemiology (IBE)Ludwig-Maximilians-UniversityMunichGermany
  3. 3.Aventis Pharma Deutschland GmbHGermany
  4. 4.Institute of PhysiologyChristian-Albrechts-UniversityKielGermany
  5. 5.Institute of Human GeneticsTechnical University Munich and GSFNeuherbergGermany
  6. 6.Department of Cardiac Surgery, University Hospital GrosshadernLudwig-Maximilians-UniversityMunichGermany

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