Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery

, Volume 398, Issue 8, pp 1069–1074

A comparative North American experience of robotic thyroidectomy in a thyroid cancer population

  • Salem I. Noureldine
  • Nicole R. Jackson
  • Ralph P. Tufano
  • Emad Kandil
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00423-013-1123-0

Cite this article as:
Noureldine, S.I., Jackson, N.R., Tufano, R.P. et al. Langenbecks Arch Surg (2013) 398: 1069. doi:10.1007/s00423-013-1123-0

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to explore the efficacy of robotic thyroidectomy in treating a North American population with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) as compared with the conventional cervical approach.

Methods

A retrospective analysis of our prospectively collected thyroid surgery database was performed. We included all consecutive patients that underwent thyroidectomy for the treatment of well-differentiated thyroid cancer, performed by a single surgeon.

Results

Twenty-four robotic transaxillary and 35 conventional thyroidectomy procedures were performed. Average size of the tumor was 1.1 ± 0.2 cm in the robotic group and 1.7 ± 0.3 cm in the cervical group (p = 0.16). Average total operative time for the robotic group was 133 ± 65.4 and 119.7 ± 22.5 min in the cervical group (p = 0.34). No robotic cases required conversion. One patient required reoperation for recurrent disease at 24 months follow-up. Both groups had similar blood loss (p = 0.37) and all margins were negative for malignancy on permanent pathology. All patients were discharged home within 24 h. Postoperative stimulated thyroglobulin levels were similar for the two groups (p = 0.82).

Conclusions

Our experience with robotic transaxillary thyroidectomy confirms this technique is feasible. It is possible to achieve a safe and effective oncologic result in a select group of North American patients with DTC.

Keywords

Comparative study Robotic thyroidectomy Transaxillary Thyroid neoplasm Papillary thyroid cancer Well-differentiated thyroid cancer DTC Thyroid surgery 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Salem I. Noureldine
    • 1
  • Nicole R. Jackson
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ralph P. Tufano
    • 1
  • Emad Kandil
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Head and Neck Endocrine Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck SurgeryJohns Hopkins School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Division of Endocrine and Oncological Surgery, Department of SurgeryTulane University School of MedicineNew OrleansUSA
  3. 3.Department of EpidemiologyTulane University School of Public Health and Tropical MedicineNew OrleansUSA

Personalised recommendations