Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery

, Volume 394, Issue 1, pp 151–157 | Cite as

Transdermal resorption of an ethanol- and 2-propanol-containing skin disinfectant

  • Martin Hartwig Kirschner
  • Reinhold Andreas Lang
  • Burkhard Breuer
  • Marion Breuer
  • Corinna Schulze Gronover
  • Thomas Zwingers
  • Johannes Georg Böttrich
  • Andreas Arndt
  • Ute Brauer
  • Matthias Hintzpeter
  • Marc-Alexander Burmeister
  • Jan-Dirk Fauteck
Original Article

Abstract

Background and aims

Ethanol- or 2-propanol-containing disinfectant agents are widely used in medical practice, particularly in the surgical environment. It was the primary objective of this phase I study to comparatively investigate the transdermal resorption of ethanol and 2-propanol within 1 h after dermal application of the two agents as single preparations and a commercial product containing both alcohols in combination, respectively. The secondary objective was to examine whether a mutual influence of the two alcohols in combination exists.

Materials and methods

Following the double-blind, randomized, three-times cross-over design for this clinical trial, 20 ml of three different alcohol-containing disinfectants were applied on a 200-cm2 gauze swab on skin areas, identical in size and location, of 14 healthy volunteers for 10 min to investigate the absorption rate of ethanol and 2-propanol with special focus on the question whether the two alcohols might influence each other’s absorption rate when being applied in combination.

Results

No clinically relevant enhancement of dermal absorption, with respect to ethanol and 2-propanol, could be observed within 1 h after application, neither when used as single preparations, nor in combination.

Conclusion

Therefore, the use of ethanol- and 2-propanol-containing disinfectants in the medical environment can be considered as safe.

Keywords

Ethanol 2-propanol Disinfectant Transdermal resorption 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Hartwig Kirschner
    • 1
  • Reinhold Andreas Lang
    • 2
  • Burkhard Breuer
    • 3
  • Marion Breuer
    • 3
  • Corinna Schulze Gronover
    • 3
  • Thomas Zwingers
    • 4
  • Johannes Georg Böttrich
    • 5
  • Andreas Arndt
    • 5
  • Ute Brauer
    • 1
  • Matthias Hintzpeter
    • 1
  • Marc-Alexander Burmeister
    • 1
  • Jan-Dirk Fauteck
    • 3
  1. 1.B.Braun Melsungen AGMelsungenGermany
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryUniversity of Munich, Klinikum GroßhadernMunichGermany
  3. 3.Proverum GmbHMünsterGermany
  4. 4.Estimate GmbHAugsburgGermany
  5. 5.B.Braun Medical AGSempach-StationSwitzerland

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