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Biological Cybernetics

, Volume 101, Issue 2, pp 81–102 | Cite as

Emergence of network structure due to spike-timing-dependent plasticity in recurrent neuronal networks. I. Input selectivity–strengthening correlated input pathways

  • Matthieu Gilson
  • Anthony N. Burkitt
  • David B. Grayden
  • Doreen A. Thomas
  • J. Leo van Hemmen
Original Paper

Abstract

Spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) determines the evolution of the synaptic weights according to their pre- and post-synaptic activity, which in turn changes the neuronal activity. In this paper, we extend previous studies of input selectivity induced by (STDP) for single neurons to the biologically interesting case of a neuronal network with fixed recurrent connections and plastic connections from external pools of input neurons. We use a theoretical framework based on the Poisson neuron model to analytically describe the network dynamics (firing rates and spike-time correlations) and thus the evolution of the synaptic weights. This framework incorporates the time course of the post-synaptic potentials and synaptic delays. Our analysis focuses on the asymptotic states of a network stimulated by two homogeneous pools of “steady” inputs, namely Poisson spike trains which have fixed firing rates and spike-time correlations. The (STDP) model extends rate-based learning in that it can implement, at the same time, both a stabilization of the individual neuron firing rates and a slower weight specialization depending on the input spike-time correlations. When one input pathway has stronger within-pool correlations, the resulting synaptic dynamics induced by (STDP) are shown to be similar to those arising in the case of a purely feed-forward network: the weights from the more correlated inputs are potentiated at the expense of the remaining input connections.

Keywords

Learning STDP Recurrent neuronal network Spike-time correlation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthieu Gilson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Anthony N. Burkitt
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • David B. Grayden
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Doreen A. Thomas
    • 1
    • 3
  • J. Leo van Hemmen
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Electronic EngineeringThe University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.The Bionic Ear InstituteEast MelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.NICTAVictoria Research LabMelbourneAustralia
  4. 4.Physik Department (T35) and BCCN-MunichTechnische Universität MünchenGarching bei MünchenGermany

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