European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 82, Issue 3, pp 178–187 | Cite as

Oxygen kinetics and modelling of time to exhaustion whilst running at various velocities at maximal oxygen uptake

  • V. L. Billat
  • R. H. Morton
  • N. Blondel
  • S. Berthoin
  • V. Bocquet
  • J. P. Koralsztein
  • T. J. Barstow
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to characterise the relationship between running velocity and the time for which a subject can run at maximal oxygen uptake (O2max), (tlimO2max). Seven physical education students ran in an incremental test (3-min stages) to determine O2max and the minimal velocity at which it was elicited (νO2max). They then performed four all-out running tests on a 200-m indoor track every 2 days in random order. The mean times to exhaustion tlim at 90%, 100%, 120% and 140% νO2max were 13 min 22 s (SD 4 min 30 s), 5 min 47 s (SD 1 min 50 s), 2 min 11 s (SD 38 s) and 1 min 12 s (SD 18 s), respectively. Five subjects did not reach O2max in the 90% νO2max test. All the subjects reached O2max in the runs at 100% νO2max. All the subjects, except one, reached O2max in the runs at 120%νO2max. Four subjects did not reach O2max in the 140% νO2max test. Time to achieve O2max was always about 50% of the time to exhaustion irrespective of the intensity. The time to exhaustion-velocity relationship was better fitted by a 3- than by a 2-parameter critical power model for running at 90%, 100%, 120%, 140% νO2max as determined in the previous incremental test. In conclusion, tlimO2max depended on a balance between the time to attain O2max and the time to exhaustion tlim. The time to reach O2max decreased as velocity increased. The tlimO2max was a bi-phasic function of velocity, with a peak at 100% νO2max.

Key words Running Critical power model Oxygen uptake kinetics Modelling 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. L. Billat
    • 1
  • R. H. Morton
    • 3
  • N. Blondel
    • 2
  • S. Berthoin
    • 2
  • V. Bocquet
    • 1
  • J. P. Koralsztein
    • 1
  • T. J. Barstow
    • 4
  1. 1.Centre de médecine du sport Caísse Centrale des Actívités Sociales (CCAS), 2 avenue Richerand 75010, Paris, FranceFR
  2. 2.University of Lille 2, Faculty of Sports Sciences, Lille, FranceFR
  3. 3.Massey University, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health, Palmerston North, New ZealandNZ
  4. 4.Kansas State University, Department of Kinesiology, Kansas City, USAUS

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