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Hoffman MD, Snipe RM, Costa RJ (2018) Ad libitum drinking adequately supports hydration during 2 h of running in different ambient temperatures. Eur J Appl Physiol 118:2687–2697

  • Lawrence E. ArmstrongEmail author
  • Michael F. Bergeron
Letter to the Editor
  • 7 Downloads

Dear Editor,

The negative effects of dehydration on physiological responses (e.g., increased cardiovascular and thermal strain), exercise performance (e.g., reduced endurance, strength and power), and health (e.g., greater risk of heat exhaustion and exertional heatstroke) have been widely documented in hundreds of publications since 1940. These detrimental effects are graduated in proportion to the amount of dehydration accrued during exercise lasting 2–3 h or longer in a hot environment (e.g., 1–4% body weight loss; 45–70% maximal aerobic power; > 33 °C). Because sweat loss and water intake are the primary factors in determining net exercise-induced dehydration, and because humans do not voluntarily replace all body weight loss via drinking (Hoffman et al. 2018), athletes/laborers/soldiers are justified in seeking supplementary approaches to practically and appropriately minimize resulting body water and weight loss.

Specific to adequate consumption of water and strategies to...

Notes

Author contributions

LEA and MFB conceived the ideas for this Letter to the Editor, edited the text, and approved the final version of this manuscript.

References

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  5. Hoffman MD, Snipe RM, Costa RJ (2018) Ad libitum drinking adequately supports hydration during 2 h of running in different ambient temperatures. Eur J Appl Physiol 118:2687–2697CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Hydration and Nutrition, LLCNewport NewsUSA
  3. 3.SIVOTEC Analytics, Boca Raton Innovation CampusBoca RatonUSA

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