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European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 113, Issue 4, pp 975–985 | Cite as

Comparison of muscle hypertrophy following 6-month of continuous and periodic strength training

  • Riki OgasawaraEmail author
  • Tomohiro Yasuda
  • Naokata Ishii
  • Takashi Abe
Original Article

Abstract

To compare the effects of a periodic resistance training (PTR) program with those of a continuous resistance training (CTR) program on muscle size and function, 14 young men were randomly divided into a CTR group and a PTR group. Both groups performed high-intensity bench press exercise training [75 % of one repetition maximum (1-RM); 3 sets of 10 reps] for 3 days per week. The CTR group trained continuously over a 24-week period, whereas the PTR group performed three cycles of 6-week training (or retraining), with 3-week detraining periods between training cycles. After an initial 6 weeks of training, increases in cross-sectional area (CSA) of the triceps brachii and pectoralis major muscles and maximum isometric voluntary contraction of the elbow extensors and 1-RM were similar between the two groups. In the CTR group, muscle CSA and strength gradually increased during the initial 6 weeks of training. However, the rate of increase in muscle CSA and 1-RM decreased gradually after that. In the PTR group, increase in muscle CSA and strength during the first 3-week detraining/6-week retraining cycle were similar to that in the CTR group during the corresponding period. However, increase in muscle CSA and strength during the second 3-week detraining/6-week retraining cycle were significantly higher in the PTR group than in the CTR group. Thus, overall improvements in muscle CSA and strength were similar between the groups. The results indicate that 3-week detraining/6-week retraining cycles result in muscle hypertrophy similar to that occurring with continuous resistance training after 24 weeks.

Keywords

Muscle hypertrophy Frequency of training Resistance training Detraining Retraining 

Notes

Conflict of interest

None declared.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Riki Ogasawara
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Tomohiro Yasuda
    • 3
  • Naokata Ishii
    • 1
  • Takashi Abe
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Graduate School of Frontier SciencesUniversity of TokyoChibaJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of Sport and Health ScienceRitsumeikan UniversityShigaJapan
  3. 3.Graduate School of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation ManagementUniversity of MississippiMississippiUSA

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